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  • #790100
    dandaz
    dandaz
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    Joined: 30 Jun 2005
    Location: 17
    Total posts: 1431

    what is the white stuff on the tiles?

    we have no damp, but we have everything else.. :D

    i thought you were younger… :)


    #790099
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    jak
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    Joined: 14 Mar 2006
    Location: N/A
    Total posts: 41

    Thomas 16 Thanks for the reply. The black plastic had small holes which would allow the water to run through. Don’t know what to do now as don’t want to make a costly mistake, we need to cover a fairly large area. We haven’t seen any green geotextile but will go and look again.


    #790098
    chris-le-bricoleur
    chris-le-bricoleur
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    Joined: 03 Dec 2010
    Location: NL and 52
    Total posts: 1381

    @dandaz wrote:

    what is the white stuff on the tiles?
    i thought you were younger… :)

    White stuff on roof tiles (pic.[12]) = snow in november.
    Younger? I’m still young. Who told you my age (or year of birth)?


    Christian - bricoleur par passion, pas par necessité http://www.klussen-in-frankrijk.eu/

    #1679699
    chris-le-bricoleur
    chris-le-bricoleur
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    Joined: 03 Dec 2010
    Location: NL and 52
    Total posts: 1381

    Triggered by a discussion in another thread I want to give some additional information about the moisture problem in our living room, see the text between pic.12-21.
    The wall I described there is the former outside wall of house no.1, 70cm thick. Later on, I think around 1880, house no.2 was built against this wall. When in the seventies or eighties of the last century the uncle of the last French owner replaced the tomette floor  by ceramic tiles grouted with cement, he experienced moisture problems on this wall. His son, the last French owner of our house, placed wooden boarding against this wall. He used a technique similar to the one shown on pic.29.


    Pic.[29]

    In the course of the renovation of this wall we removed these panels. Most of them were just wooden panels, but we discovered that a portion of the boards had sticky aluminium foil on their backside. And the limit of the moisture was higher behind these panels. Of course, since the rising damp could not evaporate from the lower sections, it had to rise higher in the wall. This is what is often called ‘forcing moisture up into the walls’ when parts of the building are sealed with damp proof material.

    The moisture profile was as shown on pic.30


    Pic.[30]

    What I’ve done after two years’ drying is shown in pic. 20 and 21.

    Now, after twelve years, still no problems.

     

     

     

     


    Christian - bricoleur par passion, pas par necessité http://www.klussen-in-frankrijk.eu/

    #1692535
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    debra
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    Joined: 05 Dec 2008
    Location: Charente
    Total posts: 5278

    My kitchen had that sort of panelling and behind it was three layers of wallpaper plus a layer of polystyrene.  I took the whole soggy mess off, took the damp plaster off up to the height the panelling had been, filled the gap and then reskimmed the wall.  So far, it’s not damp at all, even though the ground is a bit higher outside than the base of the wall inside.  I’m not sure I’d risk smothering it with fitted kitchen units though.


French Electrical & Other Building Issues
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