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  • #777838
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    nemesis
    Member
    Joined: 13 Jan 2009
    Location: N/A
    Total posts: 13

    Question ! We live at the end of a village, we have a bungalow/sous sol, we have installed electric oven and hob, electric rads and the usual sockets for vaccuum, washer etc. We are three phase at 9 kw so 3kw I assume on each. Unfortunately I don’t know how it’s divided up, and using the oven and hob plus say the vac or kettle always trips, just as tea is on the go.

    When we moved in the house unoccupied for 15 yrs, had only 6 kw as one cable in was disconnected up the edf pole !

    How easy is it to change to single phase, or is it more complex than I imagine. I’ve been told because of where we are the cables may just not be big enough to put us on monophase.

    If we could, would it help our situation. I know we could crank it up to say 12kw or 18 on tri-phase but am worried about the standing charge going up dramatically.

    Any replies greatfully received.


    #777839
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    mandrake
    Member
    Joined: 17 Jul 2003
    Location: Now Hereford previously 33 & 87
    Total posts: 2393

    First two steps :
    One – Using the instruction manuals or the manufacturers labels identify how much power each piece of equipment draws at maximum demand.
    Two – Have a look at your Tableau Electrique / Fuse Box. As you are three phase supply there should be either three separate fuses/coupe circuits or at least three Interrupter Differentials. If you have fuses switch off at the main EDF switch then remove the fuses to each circuit. Switch back on and find out which sockets and pieces of equipment are not working. Switch off again and repeat the process for the second phase and again for the third phase. If you have Interrupters you do not need to switch of at the EDF switch.

    If you now combine the two lists you should be able to check what is causing the power to trip. Unless you have a very small electric hob then using all rings by itself may be enough to break 3 kilowatts. As a further complexity things like freezers and fridges may briefly use up to 5 times their rated power consumption at startup Possibilities:

    Sort out the ‘rules’ and make sure you avoid running too much
    Buy less powerful toaster and electric kettle
    Change to a gas hob
    If the cooker is French purchased find out if it can be or is wired as three phase.
    Fit a delesteur to cut the power to things you can live without in the short term such as the hot water cylinder. May require a new Tableau Electrique and will not be cheap.
    Evaluate then upgrade the power supply.

    Unless you are much more confident of you abilities than the question suggests I would say the last three are jobs for a professional. Link below on delesteur.

    http://www.hagerpourvous.fr/menu/infos- … 24-593.htm


    #777840
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    nemesis
    Member
    Joined: 13 Jan 2009
    Location: N/A
    Total posts: 13

    Mandrake, thank you for your succinct and easy to understand reply. It’s very helpful. I think we may get a gas hob as the french electric one is about 6 kw on it’s own. Plus as you say a lower kw kettle etc. I think it’s more a wintertime problem and may be easier in the warmer months.

    Thank you.


    #777841
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    junemcmichael
    Member
    Joined: 14 Sep 2006
    Location: Hampshire and near Tilly borders 36/86
    Total posts: 12

    Interested in comments from Mandrake, Roofman etc.
    Can you help??
    Could you tell me if this is correct for wiring two lights in a room with a switch at either ingress point.
    I am not sure if you can daisy chain the second lamp of the first and if you have to run a seperate earth cable to the second lamp.
    I understand that the cabling should all be 1.5mm
    I have a copy of L’Installation Electric which has been translated into English, but it loses some of the key words/phrases in translation.
    thanks Dave :lol:

    E
    N
    L


    #777842
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    mandrake
    Member
    Joined: 17 Jul 2003
    Location: Now Hereford previously 33 & 87
    Total posts: 2393

    You should not use the light fitting itself to daisy chain/make the connection but you can install a boite de connection / deviation at a suitable point and lead the three wires off to a second light.


    #777843
    badger
    badger
    Participant
    Joined: 04 Dec 2008
    Location: Near Vire (14)
    Total posts: 1408

    If you are using a DCL (Dispositif Connexion Luminaire) you can daisy chain through them, as there are pairs of connections with which to do so. However, they are a bit of a fiddle so Mandrake’s advice is a good route to follow.


    Jonathan Badger - St Germain de Tallevende 14500 http://www.badgerlx.fr

    #777844
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    lcdxr01
    Member
    Joined: 25 Sep 2006
    Location: N/A
    Total posts: 2

    Tres interesse
    I understand from this that I can use UK light swutches, instead of the french ones. Basically a matter of cosmetic choice ?
    Are these all OK/above board ? – especially DONT invalidate the insurance

    What about (UK) double pole switches, for example to switch on heating pumps or the boiler itself, these ok as well ?

    Another one ….
    I installed the sockets in the refitted kitchen, used those legrand ones which I can only politely comment they are not good value for money comapred with MK etc. But they are wired LIVE to the right pin, wired back to a consumer unit which I had connected by a local electrician

    No need for external inspection, exisiting service,

    Do I need to reverse the Live/Neutral comnnections on the kitchen sockets ?


    #777845
    badger
    badger
    Participant
    Joined: 04 Dec 2008
    Location: Near Vire (14)
    Total posts: 1408

    @lcdxr01 wrote:

    Tres interesse
    I understand from this that I can use UK light swutches, instead of the french ones. Basically a matter of cosmetic choice ?
    Are these all OK/above board ? – especially DONT invalidate the insurance

    What about (UK) double pole switches, for example to switch on heating pumps or the boiler itself, these ok as well ?

    Another one ….
    I installed the sockets in the refitted kitchen, used those legrand ones which I can only politely comment they are not good value for money comapred with MK etc. But they are wired LIVE to the right pin, wired back to a consumer unit which I had connected by a local electrician

    No need for external inspection, exisiting service,

    Do I need to reverse the Live/Neutral comnnections on the kitchen sockets ?

    I’m not sure where you got the OK to use UK light switches from. They will not be marked “NF” (Norme Français”) & therefore are not accepted for use here. Also, why work with accessories that require square holes when the French system of round boxes & holes is far easier & quicker? Equally, why mess about with silly UK screw terminals when most decent French brands of accessories now use “bornes automatique” (push fit connections)?

    For the same reasons, don’t use UK DP (double pole) switches. Boilers & their controls should be individually supplied via a DP breaker in the distribution board anyway, & can be connected direct via a simple cable outlet.

    There’s no point in comparing UK prices for “MK etc.” with what needs to be used here in France.

    If your sockets have live on the right as you look from the front, with earth at the top, then they are correct. Put another way, live is always clockwise from earth, looking at a socket from the user side. Most good brands of accessory now mark live & neutral properly.


    Jonathan Badger - St Germain de Tallevende 14500 http://www.badgerlx.fr

French Electrical & Other Building Issues
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