Viewing 15 posts - 271 through 285 (of 308 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #1147313
    Avatar
    roadrat
    Participant
    Joined: 28 Oct 2005
    Location: N/A
    Total posts: 3683

    Regardless of those who would have it otherwise, it’s a French thing. Seen from the other side of the counter this is clearer.

    When dealing with complaining/demanding customers, the French can be really stupidly pedantic at times, if I’m pleasant and helpful in an Anglo-Saxon manner it is often almost impossible to reach an amicable solution. If I change my tone and adopt a French style of brusqueness to the point of being rude, more often than not they back down. I wouldn’t want to be the one to deduce national traits from this, but I think it’s quite clear. #-o


    #1147314
    Avatar
    wafty
    Joined: 11 Dec 2011
    Location: 06
    Total posts: 2704

    @roadrat wrote:

    Regardless of those who would have it otherwise, it’s a French thing. Seen from the other side of the counter this is clearer.

    When dealing with complaining/demanding customers, the French can be really stupidly pedantic at times, if I’m pleasant and helpful in an Anglo-Saxon manner it is often almost impossible to reach an amicable solution. If I change my tone and adopt a French style of brusqueness to the point of being rude, more often than not they back down. I wouldn’t want to be the one to deduce national traits from this, but I think it’s quite clear. #-o

    What do you do shout at them louder in English?

    You personify all the toe curling obnoxious English people in France.


    Waiting, waiting..............

    #1147315
    Avatar
    roadrat
    Participant
    Joined: 28 Oct 2005
    Location: N/A
    Total posts: 3683

    @Wafty wrote:

    @roadrat wrote:

    Regardless of those who would have it otherwise, it’s a French thing. Seen from the other side of the counter this is clearer.

    When dealing with complaining/demanding customers, the French can be really stupidly pedantic at times, if I’m pleasant and helpful in an Anglo-Saxon manner it is often almost impossible to reach an amicable solution. If I change my tone and adopt a French style of brusqueness to the point of being rude, more often than not they back down. I wouldn’t want to be the one to deduce national traits from this, but I think it’s quite clear. #-o

    What do you do shout at them louder in English?

    You personify all the toe curling obnoxious English people in France.

    What has English got to do with? I don’t have any English customers, all my customers are French, so strangely enough I speak to them in French. On average I spend 2-3 hours a day on the telephone doing so.

    I speak to all sorts from every region of France and while what I’ve said above is a gross generalisation and by no means applies to everyone, I deal with a large enough cross section to make the case. Especially as in another life I did a similar job in customers services in the UK to enable the comparison.

    So from my experience in the UK, you can usually get a result, i.e. a sale or resolution of a problem, by being nice and friendly and fair to the customer. While in France this is less likely to work and you are more likely to succeed by being brusk and demanding, even bullying.

    My point being is; that what comes across to British people as bad customer service is actually a cultural habit that has proved to be successful in dealing with the local psyche.


    #1147316
    Avatar
    exuserc2
    Participant
    Joined: 11 Feb 2012
    Location: West Sussex and 17.
    Total posts: 3561

    What does language or nationality have to do with customer service. If they are sharp and smart enough to understand you and take your money they are smart enough, or should be, to supply an acceptable service. It doesn’t matter whether your speak English, French, German or Chinese, they take your money and they fully understand what taking your dosh implies, they have to supply and acceptable level of service in a civilised manner wherever you are in the world. Personally, I don’t give a toss what nationality or country I’m in I will say my piece whatever and most understand the international 4 letter word if all else fails.


    #1147317
    Avatar
    wafty
    Joined: 11 Dec 2011
    Location: 06
    Total posts: 2704

    I rest my case


    Waiting, waiting..............

    #1147318
    mysty2
    mysty2
    Participant
    Joined: 29 Jul 2012
    Location: N/A
    Total posts: 9603

    @Offroad wrote:

    What does language or nationality have to do with customer service. If they are sharp and smart enough to understand you and take your money they are smart enough, or should be, to supply an acceptable service. It doesn’t matter whether your speak English, French, German or Chinese, they take your money and they fully understand what taking your dosh implies, they have to supply and acceptable level of service in a civilised manner wherever you are in the world. Personally, I don’t give a toss what nationality or country I’m in I will say my piece whatever and most understand the international 4 letter word if all else fails.

    Help :D your right there everyone knows that word


    #1147319
    Avatar
    juglans
    Participant
    Joined: 25 Dec 2012
    Location: N/A
    Total posts: 680

    .” Cultural stereotyping is one of the sad traits of a fair number of posters on this board.”

    There are cultural differences, thankfully. The french speak french and have their own taste in food. I love british food which is very cosmopolitan. A frenchman I know spent some time in britain and came back saying there is no good food in over there and that as a consequence he was always hungry. An important cultural difference in terms of taste in food. The french have different taste in clothes, they behave differently, they travel abroad much less frequently etc etc. It is a misjudgement not to recognise the cultural differences. Oh and they have a different sense of humour which I know to my cost, they don’t share the british taste for mockery of others( except politicians) or self mockery.


    #1147320
    Avatar
    juglans
    Participant
    Joined: 25 Dec 2012
    Location: N/A
    Total posts: 680

    If I can add one last comment to what I said above. Its a pity that the french don’t contribute to this site but I will try to add a french view of the cultural differences based on a conversation I had with a frenchman today. It was not as a joke that I said above that the french speak french. I said to a frenchman that in trying to speak french I often know the word but forget the gender. Why, I asked, is it necessary for a table to be feminine? I don’t care about its sex, just that I know it is a table. He replied that this linguistic difference shows the french to be more cultivated than the english. Their language is more refined which is why for the english you wash your knickers in a sink and the Titanic sinks. For the French there are 2 seperate words. By contrast the english language is simplistic, like anglo saxon food and its culture in general. The english in france abase, undermine, their more sophisticated culture. Clearly the french see cultural differences.


    #1147321
    goretti
    goretti
    Participant
    Joined: 16 Sep 2010
    Location: North County Dublin, Ireland
    Total posts: 2553

    I am now going to be very facetious (hehe) and point out that you are all living over in France. So the French are doing something right, if not indeed, most things.

    Please don’t say it’s weather, cos you can always hop on a plane to warmer climes. Please don’t say it’s the wine .. cos all that is available in Britain now … well, mostly anyway. And should you require a quieter, more easygoing way of life … well .. you would go a long way to beat Devon, Cornwall, Isles of Scilly, Dorset .. Channel Islands, much of Wales and Scotland, etc. etc. etc. And don’t forget Lundy.


    #1147322
    Avatar
    exuserc2
    Participant
    Joined: 11 Feb 2012
    Location: West Sussex and 17.
    Total posts: 3561

    @mysty2 wrote:

    @Offroad wrote:

    What does language or nationality have to do with customer service. If they are sharp and smart enough to understand you and take your money they are smart enough, or should be, to supply an acceptable service. It doesn’t matter whether your speak English, French, German or Chinese, they take your money and they fully understand what taking your dosh implies, they have to supply and acceptable level of service in a civilised manner wherever you are in the world. Personally, I don’t give a toss what nationality or country I’m in I will say my piece whatever and most understand the international 4 letter word if all else fails.

    Help :D your right there everyone knows that word

    Laugh, I have to take back everything I’ve said. We were in Brico Depot today buying some emulsion. We made our selection and decision having never bought French emulsion before. So I loaded onto the trolley 10 litres of white satin emulsion monocouche from the pallet below the arrow which stated the price. Expensive by comparion to the UK but hey-ho GB is a long way to go for proper Dulux emulsion. Gets to the checkout and the price has risen by €18 so I query the price but by this time the po faced girl has completed the transaction and sends me to customer services. I then go through the whole rigmarole with her. In the interim my wife has gone back to check the price on the racks. After much ado and discussion, some involving me, the woman summons a man to go and check the price which he does, he then returns and summons me to come with him. He points out the emulsion was the wrong type and some customer must have put it back in the wrong place. This argument would have held some water ONLY every 10L tin was the same and some tw*t in BD had put the whole pallet load in the wrong place at the wrong price. So back we go ‘ensemble’ to the customer services, (now you would think they might just apologise for their mistake and refund the difference – but, oh no) the woman then proceeded to refund the price to my card of the whole amount of the wrong tin of emulsion, having done this, she then dispatched us with the correct tin of emulsion to the checkouts again to pay in full for the correct tin at the corrrect price. So I then presented the cashier with the receipts which also included a 2 pairs of working gloves, oh sh*t, this blew her away, she was trying to charge us again for the same pair of gloves we had already paid for first time around, unfortunately, brain cells weren’t in abundance today, had she checked the receipts properly all would be clear, but oh no, she then had to phone and speak to the woman on customer services to confirm all of this, but unfortunately she was busy and never lifted the phone for 5 minutes (can’t deal with two things at once -eh, she was probably chatting to her mate – another customer). So after she deigns to answer the phone all becomes clear to the dimmo on the checkout and we pay again and get the f*ck out of there after 20 minutes of our time being wasted due to their stupid lazy errors – did we get so much as an apology – did we f*ck, and only my wife calmed me down from letting go with the international 4 letter words a couple of times. I actually believe the pr*t on the checkout thought we were trying to steal two pairs of gloves worth €3.98, sad pr*t. Then we are crossing the car park and I grab my wife’s arm to stop her walking into the path of a ‘blind stupid’ French pr*ck who is driving around the car park in the wrong direction against the direction of the signs and arrows, but hey-ho, they can’t drive a ‘greasy stick up a dogs ar*se’ on the highway so what do you expect in a complicated place like a Brico Depot car park. My reaction was to lump the pr*t but then more blind tw*ats did exactly the same and my OH said leave it. We got into the car and the first thing I could say was, ‘let’s get the f*ck out of this lunatic asylum’ before I murder someone. It ruined a good (cheap)lunch we’d had. Would we have been treated better in Homebase or B&Q in the UK, most certainly, these people were just f*cking rude, ignorant peasants without any knowledge of customer service or even basic manners and there was no language barrier in operation in this case. No wonder I never waste my time buying anything of consequence in France and usually buy from the UK, USA, Germany, HK or China.

    We did get some good service in Leclerc the other day but we were buying a 2.5″ 1tb portable hard disk, a 32gb USB key and an MP3/4 player which did catch their attention just a bit.


    #1147323
    Avatar
    halfpint
    Participant
    Joined: 21 Oct 2010
    Location: Auvergne
    Total posts: 1244

    :D:D:D


    #1147324
    Avatar
    juglans
    Participant
    Joined: 25 Dec 2012
    Location: N/A
    Total posts: 680

    “I am now going to be very facetious (hehe) and point out that you are all living over in France. So the French are doing something right, if not indeed, most things.”

    I’m not sure what the french are doing right. Suicide rates in france are very high, alcoholism rates in france are very high, two indicators which suggest that the french don’t like france too much…. add to which lots of young french have left france including around 400,000 who live in London.

    When the brits think of moving here they take into account 2 factors usually, the climate and the cost of housing. Which shows a simplistic attitude perhaps….

    The France as described above by Offroad is the real france, not the France which people see on holiday and delude themselves about on a wet day in the UK.


    #1147325
    Avatar
    lindal1000
    Participant
    Joined: 09 Jun 2011
    Location: france
    Total posts: 4844

    @juglans wrote:

    “I not sure what the french are doing right. Suicide rates in france are very high, alcoholism rates in france are very high, two indicators which suggest that the french don’t like france too much..

    Not necessarily.. Suicide is something that is influenced by your culture.. so the fact that suicide rates may be higher in France does not necessarily mean that the French hate France or even that the incidence of depression is higher in France. In fact France has similar levels of depression to the United States, where according to some customer service is the best in the world. [/color].. .

    When the brits think of moving here they take into account 2 factors usually, the climate and the cost of housing. Which shows a simplistic attitude perhaps….

    What Brits are you thinking of? Certainly I don’t know any Brits here who came for either of the reasons you state, although there may be some. I think tis you who has the simplistic attitutude

    The France as described above by Offroad is the real france, not the France which people see on holiday and delude themselves about on a wet day in the UK.

    The experiences of customer service described above are Offroad’s and described in Offroad’s unique and amusing style. I can appreciate them because I have experienced similar in France and the UK.. I have also had very positive experiences in both countries.


    #1147326
    Avatar
    juglans
    Participant
    Joined: 25 Dec 2012
    Location: N/A
    Total posts: 680

    Given that most brits live in expat communities with large concentrations of british people and watch british telly and read british books and papers… they did not come here for the french culture.


    #1147327
    Avatar
    lindal1000
    Participant
    Joined: 09 Jun 2011
    Location: france
    Total posts: 4844

    @juglans wrote:

    Given that most brits live in expat communities with large concentrations of british people and watch british telly and read british books and papers… they did not come here for the french culture.

    I agree that if you are a retiree and live in the Dordgone it might seem like that.. but I don’t think that applies to many of the younger generation of British people living, working and raising their children in France.


French Life & Living
Viewing 15 posts - 271 through 285 (of 308 total)

You cannot reply to this topic.