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  • #1147329
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    Chanceux
    Participant
    Joined: 17 Mar 2010
    Location: Picardie
    Total posts: 13130

    @juglans wrote:

    Why, I asked, is it necessary for a table to be feminine? I don’t care about its sex,

    The table (object) is not feminin its the noun that has gender, once you get your head around that the language and life in general becomes much simpler.


    #1147328
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    leomar
    Participant
    Joined: 08 Apr 2007
    Location: St Sever,Calvados
    Total posts: 196

    Today ,at 1pm ,I called into my local Carrefour supermarket to buy gazole for my car

    I was asked to come back at 2pm as ,they were short-staffed .

    First time in 66 years I have been refused fuel!


    Kind regards, Leo, St Sever (14380)

    #1147330
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    juglans
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    Joined: 25 Dec 2012
    Location: N/A
    Total posts: 680

    “I agree that if you are a retiree and live in the Dordgone it might seem like that.. but I don’t think that applies to many of the younger generation of British people living, working and raising their children in France.”

    yes I think you are right, there is a different attitude


    #1147331
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    exuserc2
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    Joined: 11 Feb 2012
    Location: West Sussex and 17.
    Total posts: 3561

    What I have trouble with is this word ‘culture’. To me the ‘cultural’ differences around most of western europe presents very little in the way of differences. What is French ‘culture’ and apart from food and wine how does it differ from English or British ‘culture’ – I must be blind or insensitive to this cultural thingy as all I see in France is a ‘culture’ based around food and eating but the variances are attitudinal not ‘cultural’. If one changes continents there are marked cultural differences, typically, from europe to the middle, far east or Americas but within western europe it’s all much of a muchness to my way of thinking and observations. If someone can explain the French ‘culture’ and cultural differences compared to the UK I’m always willing to listen and learn.


    #1147332
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    bentley
    Blocked
    Joined: 04 May 2008
    Location: Central Brittany
    Total posts: 3730

    juglans says
    “Given that most brits live in expat communities”

    I have searched but can find no polite way of saying that, as far as inaccurate, ill informed and rather silly generalisations go the above comment is in a league of its own and is utter and complete tosh.
    Who makes this nonsense up?


    Only dead fish go with the flow

    #1147333
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    juglans
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    Joined: 25 Dec 2012
    Location: N/A
    Total posts: 680

    Part of french culture which I think distinquishes it from british is that the french are much more family oriented, certainly in the countryside which explains why Helene says elsewhere that the whole family might turn up to look at a house for sale. There is much more opposition to gay mariage in France hence the huge demonstrations in Paris and other cities. The Catholic Church is more influential on french attitudes. The kids obey the parents and not the other way around. French music has a character of its own, its ‘top 10’ is not that of britain or the USA, it is a different type of music, romantic etc. French politics still places great important on social programmes, even under right wing governments.

    As for expat communities, I can’t speak for brittany but around here they organise their own social events, they play petanque which they call bowls, among themselves, they are never or very rarely to be found as participants in french organised social and leisure activites or contribute to the life of the village by helping out at fund raising or communal events. There are brits here whom I have never seen in the village or at local village fetes which are organised throughout the year. This might not be what you would like to hear but this does not make it utter tosh.


    #1147334
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    exuserc2
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    Joined: 11 Feb 2012
    Location: West Sussex and 17.
    Total posts: 3561

    CULTURE Definition:

    The arts and other manifestations of human intellectual achievement regarded collectively.


    #1147335
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    halfpint
    Participant
    Joined: 21 Oct 2010
    Location: Auvergne
    Total posts: 1244

    juglans you are right on my account. Came here a long time ago and it was for the weather and cheap property and thought it wouldn’t be too different from living in England.

    Sometimes in England I am hungry because I can’t eat all that cr@p that is generally the british diet.

    Gioretti , I may have stayed here but customer service is frequently bad. My daughter works in a garden centre and
    when she tells me stories of her working life I sometimes tick
    her off for it, ” you are getting too french is what I say”!! :D


    #1147336
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    riquet
    Participant
    Joined: 15 Sep 2010
    Location: North Tyneside & East 82 (not there often enough)
    Total posts: 2420

    @juglans wrote:

    ….. Its a pity that the french don’t contribute to this site

    Hm hm ….Present Monsieur ou Madame ……


    #1147337
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    barryc
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    Joined: 08 Dec 2006
    Location: N/A
    Total posts: 97

    @Offroad wrote:

    CULTURE Definition:

    The arts and other manifestations of human intellectual achievement regarded collectively.

    This is a very limited definition of culture, specifically related to the arts, as in cultural history.

    A broader one might be

    the integrated pattern of human knowledge, belief, and behavior that depends upon the capacity for learning and transmitting knowledge to succeeding generations or the customary beliefs, social forms, and material traits of a racial, religious, or social group; also : the characteristic features of everyday existence (as diversions or a way of life} shared by people in a place or time

    Academically it is sometimes referred to as “Mental programming” but I quite like Terry Pratchett who once referred to it as “basically a collection of interacting minds”.

    So yes there is definitely a French culture, although as one who spends time in both North and South France as well as frequent visits to Paris I would say it is a country with particularly prominent regional sub-cultures.


    #1147338
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    juglans
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    Joined: 25 Dec 2012
    Location: N/A
    Total posts: 680

    “Hm hm ….Present Monsieur ou Madame ……”

    Alors, what have you to say?

    As to culture and those who think it does not exist, look at Wales. They wanted their own language above all and I think that all fonctionnaires in Wales now have to be welsh speakers. From this the welsh language is taught in schools and there are obligations on the BBC to produce programmes in welsh. This promotes opportunities for welsh writers, welsh musicians and welsh producers and helps conserve thereby their welshness and the welsh way of life. I think it is also obligatory to dislike the english. In France I think there is a limit on the amount of time in which english/american tv programmes can be broadcast so that the french can maintain their artistic traditions. This said, globalisation has led to the americanisation of culture everywhere unfortunately with american tv and films and publishing and Starbucks and McDo taking over the world.


    #1147339
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    sprogster
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    Joined: 04 Dec 2007
    Location: C.I & Var
    Total posts: 1062

    Amongst many younger French people working in the service sector there is a widely held view that French people are overly critical and complaining, hence the resulting poor customer service which is so prevalent!
    I find that if I come across as the polite English gentlemen stereotype many French still believe in, quite often I will be complimented how nice the Brits are to deal with compared to their own coutrymen who I am told never show any appreciation!


    #1147340
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    bentley
    Blocked
    Joined: 04 May 2008
    Location: Central Brittany
    Total posts: 3730

    juglans you said “most” brits live in ex pat communes which is simply not true therefore falls into the “tosh” generalistaion category.
    Had you said “some” brits I wouldn’t have taken any notice.

    Just like any other immigrants in any other country some of them tend to congregate with their own kind, however from what I have read of the folk on these hallowed pages the vast majority of brits dont.


    Only dead fish go with the flow

    #1147341
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    juglans
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    Joined: 25 Dec 2012
    Location: N/A
    Total posts: 680

    “Had you said “some” brits I wouldn’t have taken any notice.”

    I think you are wrong. I would bet that more than 50% have an expat lifestyle which means most of them.

    No need to get your culottes in a twist however Bentley. This is normal. There are French expat communities in London, Indian communities in Leicester, Pakistani communities in Bradford, and one can find expat communities in Kuala Lumpur and probably in Anchorage for all I know. People often like to live among people who are like them. I know of a German expat community centred on a particular town in South Africa.


    #1147342
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    bentley
    Blocked
    Joined: 04 May 2008
    Location: Central Brittany
    Total posts: 3730

    And as I think you are wrong I will start another thread to find out and leave this one to those who seem to have difficulty whenever they go shopping.


    Only dead fish go with the flow

French Life & Living
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