Viewing 15 posts - 16 through 30 (of 206 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #777860
    Avatar
    colespr
    Participant
    Joined: 22 Jul 2003
    Location: Charente + mobile home in Charente-maritine
    Total posts: 41

    You were not taken for a ride, most French direct feed water heaters and Boilers do require pressure relief valve and regulator, I have an electric water heater, regulator set at 3 bar, with relief valve to overflow.

    regards

    Peter.
    http://mobileinfrance.mysite.wanadoo-members.co.uk

    @ib1 wrote:

    Being totally inexperienced with plumbing, I did find out about pressure regulators which I thought might be relevant.

    I needed a plumber round shortly after purchasing my house and whilst here he noticed that I didn’t have a pressure regulator fitted. Apparently one should have a 3bar pressure regulator and he said that this was quite important for rural properties (maybe you get more pressure variations).

    Maybe I was “taken for a ride”, though if that were the case, it was cheap and there were far more expensive “rides” he could have taken me for.

    I mention it only as the plumber thought not having one might potentially damage the boiler. As I didn’t have one, maybe others also don’t – or maybe its just a local thing/need in my area.

    #777861
    Avatar
    captainkirk
    Participant
    Joined: 04 Sep 2005
    Location: Cupar, Fife. - St Guen
    Total posts: 16

    Water pressure regulators

    Every home should have one especially in the UK.

    The pressure cartridges in electric valves in washing machines, dishwashers, etc, and many mixer shower units are rated at just over 3 bar. These are often damaged and have to be renwed due to high water pressures, many components in new gas heating bolier systems are aslo rated at this pressure. Water pressure above 3 bar is unnecessary unless you have a very high multi storey building.

    A 3 bar regulator is relatively inexpensive, and will be more than paid for, by one call out to your washing machine or heating system and should be fitted after the mains stopcock and any outside hose tap outlet (otherwise you will notice the difference in the pressure from your hose).

    I have seen houses with water pressure as high as 10 bar and occupiers can’t understand why the washing machine and shower break down and leak so often.


    #777862
    Avatar
    previous_webmaster
    Member
    Joined: 23 Nov 2002
    Location: Bristol, UK
    Total posts: 15

    @captainkirk wrote:

    Water pressure regulators

    Every home should have one especially in the UK.

    The pressure cartridges in electric valves in washing machines, dishwashers, etc, and many mixer shower units are rated at just over 3 bar. These are often damaged and have to be renwed due to high water pressures, many components in new gas heating bolier systems are aslo rated at this pressure. Water pressure above 3 bar is unnecessary unless you have a very high multi storey building.

    A 3 bar regulator is relatively inexpensive, and will be more than paid for, by one call out to your washing machine or heating system and should be fitted after the mains stopcock and any outside hose tap outlet (otherwise you will notice the difference in the pressure from your hose).

    I have seen houses with water pressure as high as 10 bar and occupiers can’t understand why the washing machine and shower break down and leak so often.

    Hi CK

    sounds very interesting. any idea of suppliers and costs in France? Also, what’s the French term for item.


    #777863
    Avatar
    mandrake
    Member
    Joined: 17 Jul 2003
    Location: Now Hereford previously 33 & 87
    Total posts: 2393

    They are available from Castorama, Leroy merlin etc. both sites are down this evening – I will post link when normal service is resumed.


    #777864
    Avatar
    mandrake
    Member
    Joined: 17 Jul 2003
    Location: Now Hereford previously 33 & 87
    Total posts: 2393

    For what it is worth and two years further down the track I have chosen French PER ( Soft plastic sold in reels ) for the next bathroom, kitchen and en suite. Both joints and pipe are more expensive than copper but speed of working and ability to feed through ackward holes and angles more than balance this out.

    Bricodepot sell many core fittings like ‘T’ joints without olives or nuts and leave you to chose between compression fitings, System American or PER.

    The last time I did real ‘plumbing’ was a copper to lead joint in an outside toilet about 45 years ago. I leart to braize while stitching Ford Escort shells so that they would stay in one piece long enough for a weekends motor sport.


    #777865
    Avatar
    peter72
    Member
    Joined: 16 Jun 2004
    Location: N/A
    Total posts: 1

    Brazing copper pipe is popular with French plumbers, it takes longer, requires slightly more skill and looks awful.
    British plumbers used to join lead pipe by pouring liquid lead into a bit of moleskinin their hand and wiping it onto the joint, definitely for an expert (or complete idiot, his name was Onville, a welshman) but then we got smart and started using capilliary fittings, cheap, tidy and easy.
    Capilliary fittings rely on the gap between the fitting and the pipe being quite small so that the solder is drawn into the fitting.. by capilliary action..especially important for silver soldering.
    I am surprised that someone suggests using glass paper to clean joints before soldering, I was always told it was a definite no no. Use medium wire wool only for cleaning.
    The key to good solder joints is cleanliness and a good tight fit.

    Peter


    #777866
    Avatar
    peake
    Member
    Joined: 21 May 2004
    Location: Plouasne, Dept 22 & abit further East than Jennie
    Total posts: 228

    Peter72

    All plumbers both in England & France, wiped joints on lead pipes one time and it definatly was not liquid lead they used because it would have melted the lead pipe, it was solder a mixture of tin and lead, and on big pipes it would have been splashed on with a splash stick form a ladel, the trouble with the English was that cow thatcher and the idiot willson, wh dident belive in apprentiships, and did away with the tech schools also the trade training was botched, I cut my teath on lead pipe in the ’50’s and also did cuprotetic jointing on large bore copper tube’s knocking up branches the same as lead pipe, but this was copper tube we were useing in high class work like the old baily No3 court, Glaxo labs , etc I know which I would go for and it wouldent be english, haveing worked on both sides of the water, also the yourkshire hand book cica 1964 said clean the tube and fitting with glass paper, end feed cappilary fittings can give you a bad joint if the heat dosent draw the solder into the base of the fitting,its called face jointed,and could cause the joint to fail, nd by the way its not braized jointing on copper tube in France its similar to the BOC cuprotetic rod 99%Cu and app 1% Ph


    #777867
    Avatar
    clyde
    Participant
    Joined: 20 Aug 2003
    Location: 24 NE of Perigueux
    Total posts: 173

    I’m amazed that Peter72 thinks the brazed joints look awful. Some friends have just bought a fairly new house with underfloor heating. The pipework around the boiler is all brazed and looks like a work of art!

    No solder streaks or smudges, no green flux or grubby joints. Everything looks clean, neat and very tidy.

    Just wish I had the skill to do such a super job. :cry:

    And Peake – Did Wilson have a hand in getting rid of the ITB’s? I would have thought that they would have been up his street. I recall some of my friends serving on the Engineering ITB’s and extolling their virtues for the future practical engineers of Britain.


    #777868
    Avatar
    paulburgess
    Member
    Joined: 09 Dec 2004
    Location: N/A
    Total posts: 5

    I would recommend using capilliary fitings and standard soft solder that you can buy from any DIY shop in the UK. I have just plumbed in a toilet cistern and, as long as you’re careful with the cleaning (Scotchbrite before and a cotton cloth while its still hot after) you will get a good result. I have used Silver Solder when installing the Copper pipework for the cleanrooms at BP Sunbury. About 4 miles of the stuff whithout one single leak. Silver solder/Brazing is not necessary on household copper pipework.

    Just my two penn’orth.


    #777869
    Avatar
    peake
    Member
    Joined: 21 May 2004
    Location: Plouasne, Dept 22 & abit further East than Jennie
    Total posts: 228

    Silver soldering/ Brazeing, is not nessacery on household pipework,Oh yes it is in France, this is a French posting, so if in France keep to the French reg’s, or risk your assurance being null & void


    #777870
    Avatar
    paulburgess
    Member
    Joined: 09 Dec 2004
    Location: N/A
    Total posts: 5

    I know this is no excuse but, all of the copper pipework in my house is soldered, not brazed.


    #777871
    Avatar
    vienne
    Participant
    Joined: 15 Oct 2005
    Location: Depth 16
    Total posts: 660

    @mandrake wrote:

    For what it is worth and two years further down the track I have chosen French PER ( Soft plastic sold in reels ) for the next bathroom, kitchen and en suite. Both joints and pipe are more expensive than copper but speed of working and ability to feed through ackward holes and angles more than balance this out.

    Mandrake, I know it’s a long time back but just found this on a search.
    Do you know the dimensions of the PER (internal/external/pack lengths and what is it actually made of, polypropylene?

    Thx, John


    #777872
    Avatar
    anonymous
    Participant
    Joined: 23 Mar 2012
    Location: N/A
    Total posts: 751

    :?: new to forum , going to france inmarch.what size is mains pipe in loudeac brittany. also is it plastic or metal .i have been told it is on the property but i cant find it heres hoping .jimmy


    #777873
    Avatar
    peake
    Member
    Joined: 21 May 2004
    Location: Plouasne, Dept 22 & abit further East than Jennie
    Total posts: 228

    Jimmy,

    Find your meter pit and have a look in side, you should be able to see what the main or to be a bit more correct service pipe is, it could be lead (but this should have been made clear to you when buying your propery), pvc, polythene, copper or steel the last two not so likely to be found, but I have come accross them whilst working in France


    #777874
    Avatar
    anonymous
    Participant
    Joined: 23 Mar 2012
    Location: N/A
    Total posts: 751

    Just out of interest. I have noticed very little mention of compression joints used in plumbing here in France. There are plenty of the fittings stocked by all outlets so I wonder who is using them.

    I know they are more expensive but I found them ideal because you can make changes to the system without making a whole load of mess. You also don’t have to worry about lead free solder, braising, oxy-acetyline etc…


French Plumbing, Heating & Septic Tanks
Viewing 15 posts - 16 through 30 (of 206 total)

You cannot reply to this topic.