Viewing 15 posts - 31 through 45 (of 115 total)
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  • #778100
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    francofile
    Participant
    Joined: 18 Sep 2005
    Location: N/A
    Total posts: 1

    Sorry to change tack slightly, but does anybody know which size hole cutter is required to fit a socket patresse?
    :roll:


    #778101
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    mandrake
    Member
    Joined: 17 Jul 2003
    Location: Now Hereford previously 33 & 87
    Total posts: 2393

    @francofile wrote:

    Sorry to change tack slightly, but does anybody know which size hole cutter is required to fit a socket patresse?
    :roll:

    The sizes vary between 63 and 68 mm. They are marked on the box when you buy them.


    #778102
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    peake
    Member
    Joined: 21 May 2004
    Location: Plouasne, Dept 22 & abit further East than Jennie
    Total posts: 228

    According to the Point p catalogue, a dry lining box diameter is 60mm, and 65mm for a ceiling box


    #778104
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    charentejohn
    Participant
    Joined: 22 Nov 2008
    Location: Charente
    Total posts: 20

    Hello everyone, just found this forum and impressed with the info on offer. I am an electrician, semi retired, but not registered yet as I have taken a year or more to finish the house here. So I have just done my own work here and may start working next year if all goes well.

    On the subject of books I fould this one useful, I had to buy it because of the title, The big book of electricity, and it is… http://www.amazon.fr/grand-livre-l%C3%A … 951&sr=8-1 Also covers a lot of other related things such as insulation etc.


    You must be the change you want to see in the world - Mahatma Gandhi

    #778105
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    previous_webmaster
    Member
    Joined: 23 Nov 2002
    Location: Bristol, UK
    Total posts: 15

    Hi John

    Welcome in. Just checked out the book link above and it looks impressive.

    At that price I’d expect a lot of great illustrations, so does it have them? I notice that a lot of readers who are not too sure of their French prefer heavily illustrated books to give them confidence that they’ve understood the written explanations properly.


    #778106
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    downtowntrain
    Participant
    Joined: 02 Dec 2008
    Location: N/A
    Total posts: 3

    Hi
    Have just come over to live, was an electrician in london and always registered with NIC EIC, so always used a regs book.

    Have read a lot of posting, lots mention electrical books but no one mentions a current french regulation book for domestic electrical installation.

    Do’s it exist, what is it called and where do i buy it.

    Terry


    #778107
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    tribehou
    Member
    Joined: 03 Dec 2008
    Location: N/A
    Total posts: 5

    Hi, i’m about to attempt a rewire of a house i’ve had for 6 years, it has some new, but mostly old, cabling etc.
    I found a copy of ‘the big book of electricity’ in a shop called Planet P in St .Lo (french language obviously). It’s already proving to be very useful though it was 49 euros. I’m not in any way qualified as an electrician so i’m hoping to work with guidance form various sources. If anyone has any tips , i’d be very grateful.


    #778108
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    previous_webmaster
    Member
    Joined: 23 Nov 2002
    Location: Bristol, UK
    Total posts: 15

    @tribehou wrote:

    If anyone has any tips , i’d be very grateful.

    This whole thread, from the first post forward, is full of tips to bear in mind before you begin. Beyond that, if you pose actual questions, someone may be able to give you an answer.


    #778109
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    tribehou
    Member
    Joined: 03 Dec 2008
    Location: N/A
    Total posts: 5

    webmaster
    thanks, a fair point, i was a little vague. The previous posts have already been helpful, i was just fishing for any other pointers.
    Specifically;

    Is it mandatory to install the phone points if undergoing a re-wire?


    #778110
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    tempsperdu
    Participant
    Joined: 20 Mar 2005
    Location: France
    Total posts: 275

    I think it’s only mandatory on new builds or renovations where an electrical supply and/or telephone service hasn’t been supplied before.

    But I’m not an expert in this specific matter…

    Steve


    #778111
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    charentejohn
    Participant
    Joined: 22 Nov 2008
    Location: Charente
    Total posts: 20

    On back boxes for the sockets, buy the deepest ones you can fit, there are 2 sizes and the bigger the better for installing the cabling.
    Also buy good sockets, Legrand are my favourite. If unsure check them out in the store, I have found the clamping for the cables can be poor on cheap ones, also try plugging a plug into them, sounds basic but cheap ones can cometimes be a pain to fit a plug into. My Legrand ones are smooth and easy.

    On components buy good ones too, Legrand or Hager for me. For example Brico Depot do a Nalto DB (3 rangement) for 129Euro and the Legrand one is 239Euro, pay the difference, because you’re worth it….. It is 110 Euro well spent.

    An electrical install is for life in all senses, it will be there a long time and is not helped by cheap and nasty components.

    Brico Depot are a decent source of such things but my asessment of them is that some things are cheap and ok and some are cheap and nasty. Just be aware of which are which.

    You may want to use the prefilled cable too, saves a lot of time, I priced it and it is only a couple of euros more than buying separately.
    If you need 2 way lighting etc just use one cable to pull in a piece of string then use the string to pull that cable and the additional live back through.

    All joints (junction boxes) must be acessible so if you need these in walls just use a standard back box and lid, then paint over it. They are hardly noticable.


    You must be the change you want to see in the world - Mahatma Gandhi

    #778112
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    downtowntrain
    Participant
    Joined: 02 Dec 2008
    Location: N/A
    Total posts: 3

    tribehou
    have been reading postings and have found what is suppose to be electrical wholesalers, REXEL, they seem to have brances in my area, 34,
    Don’t know if they sell to public as they do in UK.

    But i assume if you worked out all the material you needed they wouldn’t turn away all that money

    On wiring your house, start at the top and work down it’s always been the best way, if possible.


    #778113
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    tribehou
    Member
    Joined: 03 Dec 2008
    Location: N/A
    Total posts: 5

    Hopefully someone can answer this. I was hoping to buy all cable in the U.K. to rewire a french house, but i believe that BS006 ,uk,standard, does not match the current french standards. Specifically as french cable requires the earth to be insulated whereas the uk cables do not, is that correct?

    Also, does anyone know if the ‘gaigne’ ducts for protecting cables can be bought in the U.K. or again, whether they must be french specs.

    Thanks in advance.


    #778114
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    mandrake
    Member
    Joined: 17 Jul 2003
    Location: Now Hereford previously 33 & 87
    Total posts: 2393

    I could not find any reference BS006 as British Cable standard. Descpite the change to harmonised colours UK domestic flat cable does not meet the NFs are :

    The earth is a smaller cross section that phase and neutral. The earth is not seperately insulated.


    #778115
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    tribehou
    Member
    Joined: 03 Dec 2008
    Location: N/A
    Total posts: 5

    Mandrake
    BS006 is printed on the labels of any wiring bought in the U.K., I just assumed that was the U.K. standard.
    I’m assuming that all cable needs to be bought in France then, as french cable has insulated earth?
    If this is the case where’s the best place to purchase?
    Thanks


French Electrical & Other Building Issues
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