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  • #1822725
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    fahf
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    Joined: 02 Jan 2015
    Location: N/A
    Total posts: 53

    Tagging onto this thread as it sounds like my ecurie is a similar situation. Towards the back of the ecurie (which is built into a hill) is rock that juts up a bit through the concrete floor that was poured (or placed) by the previous owner (he loved the stuff – put it everywhere!) One day we’d like to dig it up and dig down 30-50cm to give ourselves enough headroom to make it a nice usable and habitable room. I suppose it depends on the type of rock – but is it difficult to remove? It’s not loose rock. It’s bedrock. Do you just try and smash it with a jackhammer until reaching the desired depth or best to leave it and convert only part of the ecurie where there is enough room?


    #1822776
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    alexv
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    Joined: 27 Feb 2011
    Location: Chongqing, China + 87 Northern Haute Vienne in the summer
    Total posts: 97

    Re. Breaking stone, when I was getting quotes for my fosse, there was an option to put it on the hillside next to the house, but that would have meant digging down into the soil/rock to create a level platform. It would have meant removing more than 1 cubic metre of possible solid rock. The company added on hire of a jackhammer at 750 euros for each half day, so I ended up going with an all-in quote to put the fosse at the back of my garage. No removal of rock or soil needed.

    It may be expensive to hire a jackhammer to do the work you want and it may be difficult work to remove the rock.


    #1822903
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    fittersmate
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    Joined: 08 Jun 2009
    Location: Brittany France dept 56
    Total posts: 1624

    If it’s just one big rock you could use the old-time method of wedges and shims to split it and break it up, like this-

    and this,


    #1822907
    DominicBest
    DominicBest
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    Joined: 14 Aug 2015
    Location: Poitou Charentes
    Total posts: 2500

    If it’s just one big rock you could use the old-time method of wedges and shims to split it and break it up, like this-

    <iframe width=”1140″ height=”641″ src=”https://www.youtube.com/embed/NVaJPsmU4Ew?feature=oembed” frameborder=”0″ allow=”autoplay; encrypted-media” allowfullscreen=””></iframe>

    and this,

    <iframe width=”1140″ height=”641″ src=”https://www.youtube.com/embed/cBMcMGBhUVk?feature=oembed” frameborder=”0″ allow=”autoplay; encrypted-media” allowfullscreen=””></iframe>
    <hr>

    It also depends on the rock. When my fosse was installed they had to cut the hole out of the limestone bedrock. I’m not sure that that would have been possible if my house was in a granite or other volcanic region.


    #1822911
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    fahf
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    Joined: 02 Jan 2015
    Location: N/A
    Total posts: 53

    Wow – that is some old school hammer and chisel work. Thanks very much for the comments. I’ll need to do some work to see what kind of rock it is and how extensive the rock is. Realistically it’ll be a decade before I can tackle this at any rate but it gives me some good food for thought in the meantime.


    #1822929
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    fittersmate
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    Joined: 08 Jun 2009
    Location: Brittany France dept 56
    Total posts: 1624

    It also depends on the rock. When my fosse was installed they had to cut the hole out of the limestone bedrock. I’m not sure that that would have been possible if my house was in a granite or other volcanic region.

    Our bedrock is granite, for fosses or digging big holes around here they use a hydraulic breaker on a digger called in english a “pecker”.

    And before power tools the holes in the rock for the wedges and feathers had to be drilled by hand, by three men.

    https://www.stone.poplarheightsfarm.org/hand_drilling.HTM


    • This reply was modified 16 Feb 2018 12:08 by  fittersmate.
    #1822930
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    fahf
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    Joined: 02 Jan 2015
    Location: N/A
    Total posts: 53

    The English must have awfully big and strong peckers!


    #1822932
    DominicBest
    DominicBest
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    Joined: 14 Aug 2015
    Location: Poitou Charentes
    Total posts: 2500

    It also depends on the rock. When my fosse was installed they had to cut the hole out of the limestone bedrock. I’m not sure that that would have been possible if my house was in a granite or other volcanic region.

    Our bedrock is granite, for fosses or digging big holes around here they use a hydraulic breaker on a digger called in english a “pecker”.

    <hr>

    I was lucky, the limestone wasn’t too difficult to break and remove and I didn’t have to pay any more than I expected. I’ve lived in granite areas and know that it can be cut into but it costs.


French Electrical & Other Building Issues
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