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  • #1795384
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    spj
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    Joined: 22 Oct 2007
    Location: Lot et Garonne
    Total posts: 1542

    I’d welcome some thoughts re what’s best to do with our cottage immersion heater and underfloor heating over the next month or so.

    We have a cottage that is used by visitors in the summer and by us in the winter.  The last of our visitors have left.  We will probably be moving back in in about a month’s time.  At the moment the immersion heater is on and the underfloor heating is set to come on if the cottage ambient temperature drops below 20ºC (early September was cold!).  The cottage has double glazing and at the moment feels cozy.

    Which is the most economical way to run the immersion heater and underfloor heating?  To turn everything off and have it all get cold and then have to reheat the cottage and the water from scratch in a month?  Or to leave everything on and have it just ticking over?

    I’d welcome any thoughts / suggestions.  Thanks Sue

    #1795391
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    Chanceux
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    Joined: 17 Mar 2010
    Location: Picardie
    Total posts: 13130

    Leave both off for any absences of more than a couple of days, I have electric UFH.

    Clearly you need to consider frost protection so in the winter months you could consider leaving it on a frost setting but if the temps drop for a long period the heating could be on 24/7

    Returning to a cold house the hot water will be fully heated within 5 hours and you wilm be able to wash dishes etc after 2 hours, electric UFH is slow to react and you cant sit close to a fan heater or electric radiator, your feet will feel warm (which is actually quite important) after 30 minutes, the rooms will be up to temp in say 5-7 hours worst case if its freezing outside but the fabric of the building wont feel fully warm for a day or so.


    #1795392
    robertarthur
    robertarthur
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    Joined: 29 Nov 2010
    Location: Nièvre (58)
    Total posts: 2157

    If your immersion heater (French chauffe-eau électrique?) is not too old it will have a good thermal insulation. But not perfect. So it will try to maintain  a constant temperature of about 65 C, switching on and off several times a day.  A cold start will take about 6 hours of energy consumption (2oo ltrs / 2 kW) Somewhere there is a break-even point in this equation.  One week or month not there: switch off.

    Your underfloor heating: as long as temperatures don’t fall below zero no need to leave it on. Unless it gives you the shivers to enter your cottage and wait two days before the temperature rises again to a comfy 20 degrees.

    By the way: I feel pretty comfy in the presence of electricity and every electronic device mankind ever invented to consume electrons, but I don’t trust electrical appliances being on all the time when I’m not there, belts and braces approach.

     

    p.s.


    RA

    #1795393
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    spj
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    Joined: 22 Oct 2007
    Location: Lot et Garonne
    Total posts: 1542

    Hello Chancer, thanks for your reply.  MOH will be delighted!

    #1795395
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    spj
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    Joined: 22 Oct 2007
    Location: Lot et Garonne
    Total posts: 1542

    Thanks RobertArthur, again, music to MOH’s ears.  I’ll go and turn everything off now!

    #1795401
    badger
    badger
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    Joined: 04 Dec 2008
    Location: Near Vire (14)
    Total posts: 1408

    I agree totally with leaving the water heater off until the day before you want it again. However, with UFH I’d leave it on frost guard/hors gel. This ensures that the internal temperature can’t go below (usually) 7°C which should mean that plumbing shouldn’t suffer, as well as your floor slab never dropping so low that it takes a long time to heat up.


    Jonathan Badger - St Germain de Tallevende 14500 http://www.badgerlx.fr

    #1795405
    vic evans
    vic evans
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    Joined: 25 Apr 2015
    Location: Brittany 29
    Total posts: 4066

    +1 with badger. I would also turn off the water ‘just in case’.

    If the plumbing is within the heated envelope of the building it will be protected by the frost protection setting of the u/f heating although if you are only leaving the property empty for the next month it’s unlikely the floor heating on frost setting will even ‘come on’.


    The power of accurate observation is commonly called cynicism by those who have not got it.

    #1795406
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    spj
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    Joined: 22 Oct 2007
    Location: Lot et Garonne
    Total posts: 1542

    Thanks Badger and Vic Evans for adding weight to the “turn off” side of the scales. :)

    In fact we only live the other end of the garden in our “summer house” (big old farmhouse with high ceilings, draughts and impossible to heat) so we are on hand to keep an eye on our “winter quarters”.

    #1795454
    vic evans
    vic evans
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    Joined: 25 Apr 2015
    Location: Brittany 29
    Total posts: 4066

    In fact we only live the other end of the garden in our “summer house” (big old farmhouse with high ceilings, draughts and impossible to heat) so we are on hand to keep an eye on our “winter quarters”.

    If you’d have said that in the beginning the sensible advice would have been to switch it all off & then pop down the garden to switch it all on again the day before you move in. :unsure:


    The power of accurate observation is commonly called cynicism by those who have not got it.

French Electrical & Other Building Issues
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