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  • #957739
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    sbcaddy
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    Joined: 20 May 2009
    Location: N/A
    Total posts: 703

    @spardo wrote:

    French people and the French way of life is surely the love of which you speak Manouche.

    I can’t speak for Kathy, although I suspect we feel the same way, but for me to mix in an overwhelming degree with British people intent on maintaining their British way of life is not experiencing or enjoying the French way.

    Nothing to do with snobbery, inverted or otherwise.

    Agree, totally.


    #957740
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    manouche
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    Joined: 11 Oct 2009
    Location: N/A
    Total posts: 1327

    @spardo wrote:

    French people and the French way of life is surely the love of which you speak Manouche.

    I can’t speak for Kathy, although I suspect we feel the same way, but for me to mix in an overwhelming degree with British people intent on maintaining their British way of life is not experiencing or enjoying the French way.

    Nothing to do with snobbery, inverted or otherwise.

    I came here for a “different life” in a different country and in one we had known very well for some time. Why must it have been for the French people, are they different to Brits in some way? And what exactly is the French way of life? In the regions we have lived here, life and its ways were often quite different and in other cities, such as Paris, Lille & Lyon & Marseille (as I know those 4 quite well) different again to the places we have lived.

    Why can’t people maintain whatever way that they had lived their life before France, British way or otherwise? I find that totally bizarre. We are deeply involved in one way, or another in living here, we have some very good English and French friends in a few regions of France, they are all lovely people, it’s hard to see the join to be honest.

    All of our life long friends are from our area of West London, you cannot recreate the history of that type of friendship. We have a place in West Sussex now, the countryside is beautiful. In other words, first the country is what drew us to France and also to the area of West Sussex, who knows in either place what friends we might, or might not have made, it is the area we chose first, not the people or way of life.

    The bottom line is: Should people be unhappy by trying to integrate, speak French and only have French friends and sadly feel unhappy, or should they act in whatever way makes them happy, even though folks like you, believe they shouldn’t be happy and must live here as you do!


    Any errors in spelling or grammar in any of my posts, I apologise for. Some of us on this Forum cannot edit our posts as there is some glitch in the system.

    #957741
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    spardo
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    Joined: 01 Mar 2007
    Location: le Périgord Vert (24)
    Total posts: 1950

    @manouche wrote:

    The bottom line is: Should people be unhappy by trying to integrate, speak French and only have French friends and sadly feel unhappy, or should they act in whatever way makes them happy, even though folks like you, believe they shouldn’t be happy and must live here as you do!

    Whoever said that I believe that people shouldn’t be happy by not living here as I do? :?

    I certainly didn’t. :roll:


    Salut, David. Follow my journeys with dogs; http://longdistancedogdiary.weebly.com

    #957742
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    manouche
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    Joined: 11 Oct 2009
    Location: N/A
    Total posts: 1327

    @spardo wrote:

    @manouche wrote:

    The bottom line is: Should people be unhappy by trying to integrate, speak French and only have French friends and sadly feel unhappy, or should they act in whatever way makes them happy, even though folks like you, believe they shouldn’t be happy and must live here as you do!

    Whoever said that I believe that people shouldn’t be happy by not living here as I do? :?

    I certainly didn’t. :roll:

    This is what you said:

    Spardo said:

    ……but for me to mix in an overwhelming degree with British people intent on maintaining their British way of life is not experiencing or enjoying the French way.

    So simply exchange the words “…..is not experiencing or enjoying the French way” then. And I say again, why shouldn’t people be happy living life in the way they want to live here.?

    What is enjoying the the French way……..?


    Any errors in spelling or grammar in any of my posts, I apologise for. Some of us on this Forum cannot edit our posts as there is some glitch in the system.

    #957743
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    kathyc
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    Joined: 30 Aug 2005
    Location: Mussidan
    Total posts: 3579

    @spardo wrote:

    French people and the French way of life is surely the love of which you speak Manouche.

    I can’t speak for Kathy, although I suspect we feel the same way, but for me to mix in an overwhelming degree with British people intent on maintaining their British way of life is not experiencing or enjoying the French way.

    Nothing to do with snobbery, inverted or otherwise.

    Exactly; the country is its people, not its countryside.


    #957744
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    spardo
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    Joined: 01 Mar 2007
    Location: le Périgord Vert (24)
    Total posts: 1950

    To say that:

    ‘for me to mix in an overwhelming degree with British people intent on maintaining their British way of life is not experiencing or enjoying the French way.’

    is not the same as saying:

    ‘that I believe that people shouldn’t be happy by not living here as I do?’

    I didn’t say that, and I don’t believe that.


    Salut, David. Follow my journeys with dogs; http://longdistancedogdiary.weebly.com

    #957745
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    manouche
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    Joined: 11 Oct 2009
    Location: N/A
    Total posts: 1327

    How is the country, its peoples?

    Are they all like Sarkozy, Bardot, Cantona? Christophe Mae, Kyo?

    I think most people would be quite aware that the countryside of any country doesn’t equate to the whole of that country. So how do the people become the country?


    Any errors in spelling or grammar in any of my posts, I apologise for. Some of us on this Forum cannot edit our posts as there is some glitch in the system.

    #957746
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    kathyc
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    Joined: 30 Aug 2005
    Location: Mussidan
    Total posts: 3579

    I have no problem with anybody living in any way they want but it isn’t inverted snobbery to want to avoid living in a Brit ghetto.


    #957747
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    manouche
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    Joined: 11 Oct 2009
    Location: N/A
    Total posts: 1327

    @kathyc wrote:

    I have no problem with anybody living in any way they want but it isn’t inverted snobbery to want to avoid living in a Brit ghetto.

    I answered that a page back!

    manouche said earlier in reply to KathyC:

    No one said you should live in, or even near Eymet. My point is that there are people who look down their noses at those who live in Eymet, merely because supposedly there are too many of them. So frankly yes, I do place that in the inverted snobbery bracket.

    And it is taking the rise somewhat to call Eymet (or anywhere else in France) a Brit ghetto. That really is rather ridiculous.

    Ghetto:

    http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/ghetto


    Any errors in spelling or grammar in any of my posts, I apologise for. Some of us on this Forum cannot edit our posts as there is some glitch in the system.

    #957748
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    kathyc
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    Joined: 30 Aug 2005
    Location: Mussidan
    Total posts: 3579

    @manouche wrote:

    @kathyc wrote:

    I have no problem with anybody living in any way they want but it isn’t inverted snobbery to want to avoid living in a Brit ghetto.

    I answered that a page back!

    manouche said earlier in reply to KathyC:

    No one said you should live in, or even near Eymet. My point is that there are people who look down their noses at those who live in Eymet, merely because supposedly there are too many of them. So frankly yes, I do place that in the inverted snobbery bracket.

    And it is taking the rise somewhat to call Eymet (or anywhere else in France) a Brit ghetto. That really is rather ridiculous.

    Ghetto:

    http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/ghetto

    On the other hand, http://oxforddictionaries.com/definition/ghetto defines the word as an area occupied by an isolated or minority group, which is the way it’s commonly used these days.

    In fact, the only snobbish comment I’ve seen here is when you said “I see no Wembley, Southall, Slough, Bradford, or Leeds etc etc,”.


    #957749
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    manouche
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    Joined: 11 Oct 2009
    Location: N/A
    Total posts: 1327

    @kathyc wrote:

    On the other hand, http://oxforddictionaries.com/definition/ghetto defines the word as an area occupied by an isolated or minority group, which is the way it’s commonly used these days.

    Are you sure? Where does it say that exactly, in the link? You appear to be mixing things up. I should read it again.

    a part of a city, especially a slum area, occupied by a minority group or groups.

    And reading the other ghetto meanings in your link, nothing even resembles the case of Eymet!!
    Calling Eymet a Brit ghetto is downright rude to the Brits and the French themselves that live there.


    In fact, the only snobbish comment I’ve seen here is when you said “I see no Wembley, Southall, Slough, Bradford, or Leeds etc etc,”.

    Snobby? You are sadly trying to take things out of context (just as you have above, where the dictionary link doesn’t state it like you have just done) The mention of those towns was simply to show how immigrants have moved into these towns in far larger numbers than the Brits have done to Eymet. Hardly snobby in any way whatsoever, just offering a simple fact.


    Any errors in spelling or grammar in any of my posts, I apologise for. Some of us on this Forum cannot edit our posts as there is some glitch in the system.

    #957750
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    kathyc
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    Joined: 30 Aug 2005
    Location: Mussidan
    Total posts: 3579

    @manouche wrote:

    @kathyc wrote:

    On the other hand, http://oxforddictionaries.com/definition/ghetto defines the word as an area occupied by an isolated or minority group, which is the way it’s commonly used these days.

    Are you sure? Where does it say that exactly, in the link? You appear to be mixing things up. I should read it again.

    a part of a city, especially a slum area, occupied by a minority group or groups.

    And reading the other ghetto meanings in your link, nothing even resembles the case of Eymet!!
    Calling Eymet a Brit ghetto is downright rude to the Brits and the French themselves that live there.


    In fact, the only snobbish comment I’ve seen here is when you said “I see no Wembley, Southall, Slough, Bradford, or Leeds etc etc,”.

    Snobby? You are sadly trying to take things out of context (just as you have above, where the dictionary link doesn’t state it like you have just done) The mention of those towns was simply to show how immigrants have moved into these towns in far larger numbers than the Brits have done to Eymet. Hardly snobby in any way whatsoever, just offering a simple fact.

    “a part of a city, especially a slum area, occupied by a minority group or groups.”

    “an isolated or segregated group or area:”


    #957751
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    manouche
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    Joined: 11 Oct 2009
    Location: N/A
    Total posts: 1327

    @kathyc wrote:

    “a part of a city, especially a slum area, occupied by a minority group or groups.”

    “an isolated or segregated group or area:”

    :lol::lol:

    Come to Eymet, a slum area, part of which is occupied by a minority group.

    Well I suppose you got the minority part right but “occupied” What area of Eymet “City” is the ghetto part in, do you know?

    The fuller explanation in the link you gave:

    a part of a city, especially a slum area, occupied by a minority group or groups.
    Historical the Jewish quarter in a city

    and an example was given:the Warsaw Ghetto

    And the other one:

    “an isolated or segregated group or area:”

    Their example was:

    the relative security of the gay ghetto

    Here is an example of that:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gay_village

    So Brits in Eymet are an isolated group! In what way would that be then?

    Segregated? So in what way are the Brits segregated in Eymet? Are they fenced in, do they have a place they can hide from the French? Are they not allowed on trains and buses, or even in the shops with French people?

    Segregation, or isolation is hardly what the Brits in Eymet can be allied to!

    Sorry but I do find it quite offensive to try and justify the word ghetto for Brits in Eymet. Do you have any idea how they are situated in and around Eymet? I suspect they are not all huddled together in one part of the town for their own “safety”. Perhaps we can be told by someone who lives there?


    Any errors in spelling or grammar in any of my posts, I apologise for. Some of us on this Forum cannot edit our posts as there is some glitch in the system.

    #957752
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    sheridan
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    Joined: 06 Jun 2004
    Location: Haute Savoie 74
    Total posts: 885

    Why is it inverted snobbery not to want to live in an area with lots of Brits?

    If I’d wanted that I’d have stayed in the UK.[/quote]

    I lked most of the people I knew in England – I certainly didn’t come to France to get away from them.
    If you don’t get on with your neighbours in one area, it is quite likely that you won’t get on with them in another. My therapist friend calls it ‘doing a geographical’ and it rarely works.


    I will be secure in the grave - now I want adventure.

    #957753
    Grumpy Yorkie
    Grumpy Yorkie
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    Joined: 30 Jan 2008
    Location: Villeréal, Lot et Garonne
    Total posts: 6782

    @sheridan wrote:

    Why is it inverted snobbery not to want to live in an area with lots of Brits?

    If I’d wanted that I’d have stayed in the UK.

    I lked most of the people I knew in England – I certainly didn’t come to France to get away from them.
    If you don’t get on with your neighbours in one area, it is quite likely that you won’t get on with them in another. My therapist friend calls it ‘doing a geographical’ and it rarely works.[/quote]

    Well said!

    This “inverted snobbery” thing is wheeled out at the first sign of anyone expressing a differing view by saying “I don’t want to live in a Brit enclave”.

    ……. and before the pedants return, frothing, “enclave” can mean “ghetto” or any equivalent word. “Brit” can mean anyone from the UK etc etc etc.

    Why can’t folk accept that different views can be held, without resorting to petty insults?

    Stuart


    Flat cap, whippet, Panda, V8 Jaguar, V12 Mercedes and a '54 Sunbeam Talbot 90 called Josephine (obviously) ................... bloody grand!

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