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  • #1824740
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    pf17472
    Participant
    Joined: 14 May 2012
    Location: Belpech 11420
    Total posts: 72

    There is one power socket that has never worked since we bought the house 4 years ago, so decided to investigate assuming either a faulty socket or loose wire but no, put my meter across the wires in the back and only 145v. As far as I can see there is nothing unusual about the house wiring, its all probably around 10-15 years old but in good condition. Any thoughts or things to check before I call in a sparks??


    #1824754
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    mikej
    Participant
    Joined: 21 Jun 2011
    Location: Dordogne sometimes and Kent the rest
    Total posts: 5287

    I an not an electrician, but In the first instance just replace the socket, could be a bad connection internally, if not I would suspect the phase or neutral has been compromised somewhere between that socket and others in the circuit, the faulty one is probably the last on the circuit, switch off the RCD and check inside the cover to see if there is only one cable connection, if that is the case find the previous socket possibly in the same room, also powered off at this time and check the connections, also how many cables, should be two, if your lucky the cable connecting the two is in a straight run of gain and the cable can be pulled out and replaced, if needed, these are just my thoughts and what I would do, but if your not confident leave it to an electrician.

    Mike


    WFIPFLL

    #1824755
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    napoleon
    Participant
    Joined: 20 Jan 2005
    Location: Surrey/Indre
    Total posts: 86

    A few questions first.

    What happens when you plug in an appliance such as a low power lamp?

    What kind of distribution box have you got?

    If your system has a modern consumer unit with an array of mcbs, locate which radial circuit it is on and identify the other sockets on the same circuit. It is probable you could pin point the preceding socket simply by the geography of the room. A faulty connection may be visible in that socket or the connection box for the room if the socket is a sole outlet in the room.

    Sorry, my comments have mainly duplicated the previous member’s reply. I failed to read it thoroughly.

    KEEP SAFE


    • This reply was modified 13 Mar 2018 12:47 by  napoleon.
    #1824761
    robertarthur
    robertarthur
    Participant
    Joined: 29 Nov 2010
    Location: Nièvre (58)
    Total posts: 2157

    PF, probably you have measured with a modern high impedance multimeter, currents in the micro or milliamp region.  If it’s a case of a contact resistance somewhere the voltage will probably drop to almost zero as soon as you plug in equipment providing a real load (electric heater), as suggested by Napoleon. Backbox somewhere with dominos?


    RA

    #1824763
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    pf17472
    Participant
    Joined: 14 May 2012
    Location: Belpech 11420
    Total posts: 72

    Solved… As suggested the voltage did disappear when a load was plugged in, checked nearest working socket and lo and behold neutral wire had come loose, all now functioning, her indoors is happy as I can now move the router into the corner….. Why do women hate wires????? Isn’t it supposed to be wireless she asks?

    Thanks for all your replies, I will miss this forum, Anyone know of an alternative?


    #1824765
    robertarthur
    robertarthur
    Participant
    Joined: 29 Nov 2010
    Location: Nièvre (58)
    Total posts: 2157

    PF, not running the risk of being accused of concurrence déloyale now this forum comes to an end you could try this one.  My compliments, welcome in the league  of ghost voltage hunters. Robert, may I borrow your 114 meter? Yes, but using a little 230 volt light bulb with two measuring leads as my father once did is still an effective answer in tackling the pitfall of ghost voltages.


    RA

    #1824883
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    fittersmate
    Participant
    Joined: 08 Jun 2009
    Location: Brittany France dept 56
    Total posts: 1624

    “Yes, but using a little 230 volt light bulb with two measuring leads as my father once did is still an effective answer in tackling the pitfall of ghost voltages”

    +1 on that from me!

    As I said to my apprentice as he was f*rting about with a digital voltmeter whingeing about “I’ve only got 11 volts on a 12 volt system”

    “What you need lad is a 12 volt test lamp – if it lights its live – if it don’t it’s dead”


French Electrical & Other Building Issues
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