Viewing 15 posts - 31 through 45 (of 95 total)
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  • #778978
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    mister
    Member
    Joined: 01 Nov 2006
    Location: N/A
    Total posts: 3

    Thanks George, not sure how I missed that link the first! I’ve now had a look at the English version of the site but can’t find the info I require. Hopefully someone else out there will be able to offer me the benefit of their experience re: the use of these Calcia products and if they might damage granite stone buildings.


    #778979
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    africa_rock
    Participant
    Joined: 08 Jan 2007
    Location: Dartmoor - Pyrenees
    Total posts: 36

    Quick question?

    Has anybody had any sandblasting done in france? I have a s**t-load of pointing to do both interior and exterior of a barn and a friend in the UK had his whole devon barn sandblasted to take the existing pointing and dirt back to the required depth for re-pointing.

    This had the ancillary benefit of bringing the stonework up perfectly and as if that was not enough the Sandblasting chap blasted all the beams back to save those mind numbing days of cleaning and sanding beams.

    I would be interetsed to know if anybody could give the the low down if you can rent sand blaster folks (or just the equipment) in france (I am near Luchon in the Pyrenees) and the cost?

    cheers for all the great info on mixes n stuff

    stuart


    #778980
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    rod
    Member
    Joined: 26 Jun 2006
    Location: cornwall and dordogne 24580 nr rouffignac perigord noir 24
    Total posts: 72

    what about a jet wash?for the outside anyway, friend of mine had internal beams sand blasted and got little bit of sand coming out of the timber 6 years later still


    #778981
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    bd3cc
    Participant
    Joined: 18 Nov 2006
    Location: N/A
    Total posts: 6

    I have hired the equipment to sand-blast on several occasions. Essentialy it consists of a large diesel compressor, a hopper for the sand, (different grades are required for differnent materials) and the nozzle with ceramic jets. Also supplied are the helment with air feed, tear of strips for the visor.
    I would think these are available in any hire-outlet, and the will advise and sell you the necessary sand/grit.
    You need to look for “sableuse” in the catalogues online


    #778982
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    njprotzy
    Member
    Joined: 08 Jun 2006
    Location: N/A
    Total posts: 1

    Hi. Thanks to you all for the above. I’m just about to undertake re mortaring and redering to a stone property in South Dordogne (Belves) This is a rendered buliding but years of wear mean that on the lower walls mortar is also washed out to a depth of some 6+ centimeters. I’m steeling myself for some hard cleaing and mortaring followed by re rendering, but reading up on the subject suggests that the french pro would use a mortar pump to mortar and a crepi sprayer to render. It sounds easier and quicker. Has anyone any experience of hiring & using these? Any comments very greatfully received. Thanks Nick


    #778983
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    andysparky
    Participant
    Joined: 15 Apr 2007
    Location: Margate, Kent
    Total posts: 2

    nice one, makes me feel like I have been doing it half right, I have been using the ready mixed stuff from Big Mat (available in loads of colours), I take your point about the sagging and cracking in larger joints. I have been using a fairly course nylon brush.The hardest part for me has been with getting the timing right with the brushing out.


    #778984
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    andysparky
    Participant
    Joined: 15 Apr 2007
    Location: Margate, Kent
    Total posts: 2

    dunno what happened there, I was replying to another post on rendering, …oh no technofear.


    #778985
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    captain25
    Participant
    Joined: 25 Mar 2006
    Location: Ambert
    Total posts: 145

    I have just bought an old place just like everybody else on here.And my house has been already rendered by what seems to me cement mix as in uk, cracks everywhere , but that is to be expected,with such an old building, the barn has a largish crack about seven feet up to the roof, I was told that you must use lime mix to render the whole barn. While i agree with the french long used method i am not convinced that using lime and sand is going to be any good.Its all very well to let the building breath and move , but as i am told lime doesn,t set for years there seems to be a catch 22 situation here.
    There has been some rendering on the side of the hanger, and thats the throw method i think. bloody awful finish.
    I still don,t see why i can,t use the sand and cement method as we use here.
    much stronger and you get a brill finish.
    If you have ever owned or been in a thatch cottage over here you wil haver no doubt noticed how damp they always smell, and thats due top the lime on the out and inside. Why not just inject silicone into the base and have done with it.?


    I am a self employed welder married to a Japanese wife and have a grown up daughter, l will be hopefully moving full time to a plot with a fishing lake in a couple of years time .l am out going and tend to get excited over engineering subjects and love cooking .

    #778986
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    bd3cc
    Participant
    Joined: 18 Nov 2006
    Location: N/A
    Total posts: 6

    The reason you have cracks everywhere should explain why you dont want to use cement render in an old building.
    I would suggest that the reason cottages smell musty is that they have an earth floor, rather than the lime finish on the walls.
    You can put a membrane under the floor, but I very much doubt you can successfully inject a silicon dampcourse into stone walls.
    I would suggest reading up on lime finishes(chaux, CAEB etc) at various websites before going with cement.


    #778987
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    matnik
    Member
    Joined: 17 Apr 2006
    Location: Cher
    Total posts: 54

    Whats the best way to bring “a bit of life” back to the stones in the wall. Would a brick acid cleaner be okay or a definate no no?


    #778988
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    petercherry
    Participant
    Joined: 02 Sep 2005
    Location: Derbyshire & La Creuse
    Total posts: 40

    Depends on the stone – maybe jet-wash, sand-blast (careful with both), or simply brushing (good stiff yard broom is good initially), followed by more detailed brishing where needed. I’m thinking internal here, but this would help externally as well. Then if it needs pointing, point it! I would only use brick acid if there was something on the wall I couldn’t get off easily, but I would try a test area first.

    Let us have more details about what you are doing & maybe we can help more.

    Peter


    #778989
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    matnik
    Member
    Joined: 17 Apr 2006
    Location: Cher
    Total posts: 54

    Not sure what the stone is but I have yet to find a drill bit that touches it. It,s internal in a smallish room that already has been floor tiled.I discovered the wall behind a newer block wall and thought it would be nice exposed.The stones are a lightish brown colour and definately needs repointing.


    #778990
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    petercherry
    Participant
    Joined: 02 Sep 2005
    Location: Derbyshire & La Creuse
    Total posts: 40

    I don’t know your region, but if it’s that hard I suspect it is granite. I have the same problem, though the decent Bosch masonary bits (blue colour) on a standard driill work well or Dewalt etc on an SDS. What is it exactly that is stuck to the wall that you don’t like? (paint, plaster ..)

    Our place had been stripped back to the stone i.e. plaster removed – it left the plaster remnants, and the very soft mortar which was crumbly & almost like a brownish mud – at least very easy to clean for pointing. We use a chipping/welding hammer & some old large 6″ nails with the ends flattened off with a grinder (use both ends of the nail depending on joint size). Clean back a good inch or more on wide joints. The old plaster and muck on the stone came off easily with a jet washer, though we had to be careful as it would chip the stone as well in places (granite is hard but sometimes brittle). In other plasces we’ve just brushed and scrubbed it.


    #778991
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    matnik
    Member
    Joined: 17 Apr 2006
    Location: Cher
    Total posts: 54

    We are in the northern Cher and yes it could welll be granite.The joints are, as you say, like a brown mud.I have an excellent tool for raking out which is actually used by auto window fitters for peeling back the rubbers on windscreens.I wasn’t sure how far to take the pointing back in as it just keeps on coming being so soft, you reckon about an inch is enough? Its only old plaster on the stones but I just wondered about something to brighten them, as it were


    #778992
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    bentley
    Blocked
    Joined: 04 May 2008
    Location: Central Brittany
    Total posts: 3730

    I have an old stone wall frontage on the house in varying sizes from fist size to football size, in about three different stone types. Basically from what I can gather anything that was handy from the ground about three hundred or more years ago. It looks fantastic from a distance but when you get up close you can see that most of the pointing has been washed out to a depth of up to 3 or 5 centimetres. I will be using a lime mortar but I don’t want the mortar to be too obvious. I have bought a pointing gun (35 quid from local UK tool shop) this is just like a big silicon gun with a refillable tube. It has two different nozzle sizes and will be able to get right into the deep bits albeit with a bit of wrist ache.
    Here is the only concern in my plan, I don’t really want to see too much of the mortar as the stones are stunning in their own right, will it be a problem in terms of water ingress if I point to say within a centimetre of the face of the stone.? Most of the joints are a less than centimetre, The walls are 950 thick at the base and 800 at the top 4 .2 meters high.


    Only dead fish go with the flow

French Electrical & Other Building Issues
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