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  • #779024
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    bentley
    Blocked
    Joined: 04 May 2008
    Location: Central Brittany
    Total posts: 3730

    Forgot to add the photos
    First the rendered wall using sieved torchis dust in the mix
    Photobucket

    Photobucket

    Then we have the wall that Mrs Bentley built. The stones are in place with 3 rough sand one lime and half a multibat. They will be pointed with the same mix as the rendered walls which is 3 sharp sand one lime one sieved torchis.

    Photobucket

    Photobucket


    Only dead fish go with the flow

    #779025
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    teapot
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    Joined: 10 Jul 2008
    Location: Tours
    Total posts: 2372

    Nice Job! Well done Mrs Bentley!!

    Your stone looks to be hard granite and flint mainly so you can probably get away with multibat as they dont move much compaired with our local Tuffau limestone.

    If you use multibat on limestone its too hard and just pulls away when the limestone expands/contracts or settles and makes a weaker wall than the clay/mud that it is replacing, hence what guillaumebatiment was saying about NHL2


    Raising the standards of swimming pool knowledge and technology.

    #779026
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    bentley
    Blocked
    Joined: 04 May 2008
    Location: Central Brittany
    Total posts: 3730

    Mrs Bentley is indeed “well chuffed” with her new found stone walling skills. She also completed the opposite one to match and now has a 5 meter X 4 meter one to do at the front of the house.
    I am putting together photos, video footage and narrative of the entire project so far and posting on Expo soon.
    Some is granite, some flint, some sandstone, some slate and some unidentified. The chaux sand and torchis mix works really well especially when joing old to new or vice verca


    Only dead fish go with the flow

    #779027
    dandaz
    dandaz
    Participant
    Joined: 30 Jun 2005
    Location: 17
    Total posts: 1431

    That is some pretty wall .well done mrs ” B “…


    #779028
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    jprome
    Member
    Joined: 11 Aug 2010
    Location: N/A
    Total posts: 1

    Hello has anyone used a crepinette like
    http://www.shopix.fr/crepinette-pneumatique,p299.html
    for lime mortar pointing?

    I would be interested in any successes or failures!!

    Thanks in advance.


    #779029
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    teapot
    Participant
    Joined: 10 Jul 2008
    Location: Tours
    Total posts: 2372

    No good for pointing, that is for applying crepi or enduit.

    Read the following and you will see the pnu-point

    http://www.totalfrance.com/france/forum/viewtopic.php?t=60422&postdays=0&postorder=asc&&start=0

    http://www.pnupoint.com/index2.html


    Raising the standards of swimming pool knowledge and technology.

    #779030
    andy72
    andy72
    Participant
    Joined: 26 Oct 2008
    Location: Charente and NOT Milton Keynes
    Total posts: 7939

    Hi

    We are repointing the inside of our cottage soo. We have about 80m2 to point. We will be using sand/lime mix 4:1 but i’m not sure how much lime and sand to buy. We are raking out to about 2cm and intend to point level with the stone sufrace. Anybody got any ideas how much sand and lime we will need?

    Thanks


    Starve the troll

    #779031
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    skye
    Member
    Joined: 21 Jun 2006
    Location: N/A
    Total posts: 9

    To give you a rough idea I’ve just finished about 90 square meters externally and used about 180 kilos of sand and 60 of chaux (3:1). Is there a reason you’re using 4:1?


    #779032
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    teapot
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    Joined: 10 Jul 2008
    Location: Tours
    Total posts: 2372

    @andy72 wrote:

    Hi

    We are repointing the inside of our cottage soo. We have about 80m2 to point. We will be using sand/lime mix 4:1 but i’m not sure how much lime and sand to buy. We are raking out to about 2cm and intend to point level with the stone sufrace. Anybody got any ideas how much sand and lime we will need?

    Thanks

    May I suggest that you study the St Astier information as no where do they use such a weak mix.

    http://www.stastier.co.uk/nhlhttp://www.frenchentree.com/wp-content/uploads/assets/nhl35.htm


    Raising the standards of swimming pool knowledge and technology.

    #779033
    andy72
    andy72
    Participant
    Joined: 26 Oct 2008
    Location: Charente and NOT Milton Keynes
    Total posts: 7939

    @skye wrote:

    To give you a rough idea I’ve just finished about 90 square meters externally and used about 180 kilos of sand and 60 of chaux (3:1). Is there a reason you’re using 4:1?

    We used 4:1 when rebuilding a wall and it worked out fine. I’m happy to go for 3:1 though if others have found that suitable for repointing. Thanks both for the replies.


    Starve the troll

    #779034
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    bentley
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    Joined: 04 May 2008
    Location: Central Brittany
    Total posts: 3730

    Make sure you use the finer sand (0.2) for the re pointing as opposed to the coarser 0.4 that is used when making the stone walls and repairing the same.
    3-1 seems to be the norm although we use 3 sand 1 lime and 1 sieved torchis/mud. Goes on like cream and is the right colour when dry.
    Good luck


    Only dead fish go with the flow

    #779035
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    guillaumebatiment
    Participant
    Joined: 03 Jan 2009
    Location: St.Maixent l'Ecole (79)
    Total posts: 10

    Hello Mr.Bentley.

    I’m surprised that you advocate 02 Sand for your pointing mix. This is of course a monograde. If you were going to use a fine sand, it would be 0/2, which comprises a grain size of zero up to 2mm.

    Personally, I use 0/4 because I like the texture it gives, and variety of grain size and colour. I find that the finer sand gives a very flat colour, similar to a readymix pointing product.

    As Teapot will verify, the quantity of Lime needed for a mix is entirely related to the grain size. The finer the grain, the less lime is needed. In the event of earth being used in a mix, this has the effect of needing much less lime, as it is infinitely fine, in the case of clay soil, for example.

    Toodle pip, Andy.


    #779036
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    bentley
    Blocked
    Joined: 04 May 2008
    Location: Central Brittany
    Total posts: 3730

    Aye aye Andy, A fair point you make however we have found that with the sieved mud in the mix and the finer sand it gives a better pointed finish, particularly inside. The only thing with the interior pointing is that the weather and frost wont naturally clean the stone so because the bits of revealed stone we have chosen to leave we want to be looking good we are going to experiment with a small fine sand blaster and see if it “brings it up”
    I will post the results either way.


    Only dead fish go with the flow

    #779037
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    benm
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    Joined: 22 Mar 2009
    Location: N/A
    Total posts: 67

    I’ve been using 4 to 1 with 0/2 as suggested by local materials yard. It goes on well and looks good. 3 measures 0/2, 1 measure red 0/2, 1 measure chaux gives a nice ton pierre colour. More red makes it a bit too pink for my taste.
    0/4 looks good as well though.


    #779038
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    frankncarmen
    Participant
    Joined: 14 Jan 2009
    Location: 18
    Total posts: 18

    @alanorme wrote:


    The mix is 1 x St Astier to 2 of sand in the mixer.

    Amazed at the range of ratios in use in this discussion! I think I must have ended up at the sources Alan used and found 2 sand 1 NHL 3.5 gives a better result than 3:1.

    Somewhere I came across a history that said the WW1 killed of most of the artisans and that as cement took over thereafter the skills got lost. Someone came up with the 3:1 ratio and it just stuck. But there has been a lot of research on compositions of old mortars and it was found that mixes varied from 1:1 – 3:1 with various explanations as to why each were used consistently in particular situations. But for the most part 2:1 was the commonly found ratio for general use. It is certainly (2:1) a lot more stable and less dusty later than 3:1. Chemically the lime bonds to the sand and it was suggested that 2:1 gave the strongest most stable end result. Also 2:1 seems to stick a lot easier than 3:1.

    Sorry I did not hang on to URL’s but the info is all out there.


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