Welcome to the FrenchEntrée guide to living in France. Here you will find all the information you need in order to make the most of your new life in France. Moving to France is a very exciting prospect, but at the same time, relocating to another country can be rather challenging.

Whether retiring to France or moving to France as a family with children, our indispensable articles will help you choose the right area of France to live in, find and buy a property, give you tips for learning French and explain how to start a business or find a job.
You can also learn about the French school system, how to take out health insurance, manage your pension income and everything else you need to know to make your move to France as stress free as possible. Then you can simply relax and make friends with your neighbours and enjoy the climate, food, wine and the laid back French lifestyle.

Latest articles on living in France

Domaine St Jacques d albas vineyard in Languedoc

The Wild Southwest: Meet the Pioneers of Languedoc

The Outsiders are a group of wine producers from all around the world who settled in this part of France, attracted by affordable prices, diversity and a sense of freedom, writes Patrice Bertrand We could have gone somewhere else but

Orne

Property Showdown: Orne Versus Eure

These neighbours, with their glorious greenscapes, are just are a stone’s throw from the Channel coast Orne Thinking of buying in Normandy? As well as the lush countryside and great food, you’re probably drawn to the miles of coastline. However,

Montaigu-de-Quercy

Where to Buy in France: Montaigu-de-Quercy

Tarn-et-Garonne, Occitanie The ancient province of Quercy truly is a land that time forgot, where you will find, hidden away in sleepy backwaters, some of the most attractive rural architecture in France. Fortified towns known as ‘bastides’ (taken from the

Where to buy in France: Pézenas

Hérault, Occitanie Many folk who have set foot in Pézenas claim it’s like “stepping back in time”. Certainly, the town’s impressive tally of 30-plus monuments historiques and 17th-century hôtels particuliers, with their wrought-iron balconies and grand courtyards, fire the imagination.