Viewing 15 posts - 31 through 45 (of 78 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • #1169041
    chris-le-bricoleur
    chris-le-bricoleur
    Participant
    Joined: 03 Dec 2010
    Location: NL and 52
    Total posts: 1381

    And now the ceiling of my bathroom

    Knowing about the difficulties of different materials touching each other (differences in coefficient of expansion due to temperature and moisture) I decided that my ceiling should not touch the tiled walls of the new bathroom. I applied what is called in other languages a ‘shadow seam’. Haven’t found the equivalent expression in British or US-American literature. See here what it looks like:

    I installed the typical hangers-and-rail construction described a.o. here: see pics 6 – 9.

    Above the rails, between the joists, there’s enough space for cables and other installations (water, central heating, ventilation ducts). In my project I used this space for electricity only, the exhaust tube of the fan goes directly through the ceiling into the loft.

    Since this was the first time I applied the technique of a hanging ceiling not touching the walls I did it in an unnecessarily complicated way. Here I describe how I would do it now, with the lessons learnt. A friend of mine did it this way and it worked perfectly.

    Screw (or nail) a batten (1) of typically 30x40mm against the wall, around the total perimeter of the room. Screw an Aluminium T-profile (2) of typically 15x15mm against this batten. Lay the rails of the ceiling system (3) at exactly the height of the T profile. Screw the plasterboard against this profile, using the well-known techniques, as shown here, pictures 10 – 15.

    In my bathroom I only installed lightweight spots, see pic 19. For heavier lamps I would always use a DCL with the proper tige filetée taking the weight, pic 21 and 22.

    If you have beams you want to keep in sight you can use one of the solutions I have applied in the other rooms of our house.
    Again, the text is Dutch/Flemish, but the language of the pictures is international.


    Christian - bricoleur par passion, pas par necessité http://www.klussen-in-frankrijk.eu/

    #1169042
    chris-le-bricoleur
    chris-le-bricoleur
    Participant
    Joined: 03 Dec 2010
    Location: NL and 52
    Total posts: 1381

    In my last post the last-but-one alinea should have read:

    In my bathroom I only installed lightweight spots, see here pic 19. For heavier lamps I would always use a DCL with the proper tige filetée taking the weight, pic 21 and 22.

    Had forgotten the link. Excuses.


    Christian - bricoleur par passion, pas par necessité http://www.klussen-in-frankrijk.eu/

    #1169043
    Avatar
    mikej
    Participant
    Joined: 21 Jun 2011
    Location: Dordogne sometimes and Kent the rest
    Total posts: 5287

    Chris

    In UK Architectural terms it is know as a “Shadow Gap” detail.

    Mike


    WFIPFLL

    #1169011
    tomdenne
    tomdenne
    Participant
    Joined: 29 Oct 2008
    Location: 58 La Nièvre
    Total posts: 4459

    :D What a wonderful thread for someone like me who is just about to start to renovate a bathroom. Thank you Chris and hearty congratulations. Particularly like your shadow gap ceiling and also the red ‘listel’ placed unusually high. White tiles are great but they can look a bit clinical. The high red listel discretely solves this and doesn’t get broken by having to avoid doors, windows, fixtures etc. A great job.

    Tom


    Tom

    #1169010
    chris-le-bricoleur
    chris-le-bricoleur
    Participant
    Joined: 03 Dec 2010
    Location: NL and 52
    Total posts: 1381

    Tom,

    about the white base colour.
    My (and my wife’s) principle is:
    Keep everything that cannot be changed easily a bit neutral. Variation comes through accessories (towels, curtains, and all the other stuff you expose in a bathroom.
    But that is our choice. If you like decorated tiles, or tiles in vivid colours – go ahead, it’s your choice and your bathroom!


    Christian - bricoleur par passion, pas par necessité http://www.klussen-in-frankrijk.eu/

    #1169009
    tomdenne
    tomdenne
    Participant
    Joined: 29 Oct 2008
    Location: 58 La Nièvre
    Total posts: 4459

    If you like decorated tiles, or tiles in vivid colours – go ahead, it’s your choice and your bathroom!

    :D Not at all Chris! Sometimes I feel the taste in our house is a bit too neutral. That’s why I particularly liked your red listel.

    Tom


    Tom

    #1169007
    chris-le-bricoleur
    chris-le-bricoleur
    Participant
    Joined: 03 Dec 2010
    Location: NL and 52
    Total posts: 1381

    :lol: Two persons, one opinion. =D>


    Christian - bricoleur par passion, pas par necessité http://www.klussen-in-frankrijk.eu/

    #1169008
    Avatar
    alittlebitfrench
    Blocked
    Joined: 06 Aug 2013
    Location: France
    Total posts: 2468

    Chris.

    Why did you secure the beton cellulaire (i love beton cellulaire) with a braket to the wall ?

    I have seen it done with carreaux de platre but not BC.


    #1169006
    chris-le-bricoleur
    chris-le-bricoleur
    Participant
    Joined: 03 Dec 2010
    Location: NL and 52
    Total posts: 1381

    ALBF,

    just to be sure that the joint is solid I placed brackets at every second layer. The wall (left in my picture) to which I anchored the shower separation wall (beton cellulaire) was a metal stud wal covered with hydro-plasterboard and tiled. This material and BetCell have different coëfficients of expansion; therefore I wanted a solid joint. Furthermore: how strong is the adhesion of colle pour béton cellulaire on tiles?

    I’ve seen too many combinations of different materials which failed after some months or years, like this one:


    Christian - bricoleur par passion, pas par necessité http://www.klussen-in-frankrijk.eu/

    #1169005
    Avatar
    alittlebitfrench
    Blocked
    Joined: 06 Aug 2013
    Location: France
    Total posts: 2468

    I missed that in the photo , i.e, that is was being glued to the carrelage.

    I have built walls ‘on’ carrelage (using the colle BC) and never had any problems. But I think you were right and very clever to do that.

    A trick I have learnt with BC. Most times after building a wall or whatever, I enduit BC, then paint ect. But building and keeping a wall straight in BC is really hard. One side tends to give.

    Now I just build a wall in 5cm BC, and mortar plasterboard to it. That allows me to straighten it and provides later a good surface to screw thing into it. It also sound like a proper wall and not like a stud partion.


    #1169004
    Avatar
    Char
    Keymaster
    Joined: 07 Feb 2009
    Location: 23. Creuse. Limousin.
    Total posts: 5368

    Just to say – I’ve made this a sticky to make it easier for people to find. :)


    #1169003
    chris-le-bricoleur
    chris-le-bricoleur
    Participant
    Joined: 03 Dec 2010
    Location: NL and 52
    Total posts: 1381

    Good trick, ALBF, your method of building with BC.
    See here my hints for BetCell. Please also take a look in the links mentioned there.

    @char: Thanks for the honour.


    Christian - bricoleur par passion, pas par necessité http://www.klussen-in-frankrijk.eu/

    #1169002
    Avatar
    bentley
    Blocked
    Joined: 04 May 2008
    Location: Central Brittany
    Total posts: 3730

    Aye Aye Chris fine looking job as I have already said, can I ask, what for some may be an obvious question, but why have you started the tiles one or two courses up from the floor?
    I am just getting ready to tile bathroom floor (floor first) and then the shower room and bathroom walls, so wondered if there were any special tips and why the gap at the start of the process to the floor.
    Cheers
    Bentley


    Only dead fish go with the flow

    #1169000
    Avatar
    riquet
    Participant
    Joined: 15 Sep 2010
    Location: North Tyneside & East 82 (not there often enough)
    Total posts: 2420

    Isn’t it where his bath is going ??


    #1169001
    chris-le-bricoleur
    chris-le-bricoleur
    Participant
    Joined: 03 Dec 2010
    Location: NL and 52
    Total posts: 1381

    Bentley,

    This is something I have learnt from a professional tiler (or how do you call a professional who places tiles??).
    The first course always has an uneven gap to the floor if this has a certain inclination gradient, and this gap has to be filled with caulk rather than grout. How do you achieve a completely horizontal first course on a floor which is not perfectly level, even if you use tiling crosses or plastic wedges? You would be obliged to correctly align the upper edge of these tiles.

    It is therefore easier to start with the second course. I place this on a ceiling profile which I screw completely level to the plasterboard. Any other profile or a batten would also be OK, as long as you can adjust it when screwing. From there on I can place my tiles with constant gaps using long leg tiling crosses. http://www.protilertools.co.uk/tiler-tool/30/tiling-spacers
    Then I remove the rail and place the first course. I push the tiles up against the correctly laid second course, using tiler’s crosses for the upper gap and wedges on the lower side.
    In one case I’ve started two courses from the floor; that was on the frontside of the WC-box. I did this because this was the first ‘complete’ course, I had to cut big holes in the lower ones around the piping connections.

    When the floor has an extreme gradient, e.g. in a douche à’l Italienne, then it may be necessary to cut the lowest tile course accordingly in order to avoid a caulked joint which runs from nothing to 5mm. But that’s a terrible job.

    Bentley, success with your bathroom and shower!

    The ceiling profile I use can be seen here on pic.35 (the one along the beam).


    Christian - bricoleur par passion, pas par necessité http://www.klussen-in-frankrijk.eu/

French Plumbing, Heating & Septic Tanks
Viewing 15 posts - 31 through 45 (of 78 total)

You cannot reply to this topic.