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  • #1168999
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    alittlebitfrench
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    Joined: 06 Aug 2013
    Location: France
    Total posts: 2468

    That is the top tip of the day, week, and month.

    I like your tiles too. Plain white is beautiful.


    #1168998
    chris-le-bricoleur
    chris-le-bricoleur
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    Joined: 03 Dec 2010
    Location: NL and 52
    Total posts: 1381

    @alittlebitfrench wrote:

    That is the top tip of the day, week, and month.

    … of the year, the decade, the century? :D
    I’m just a simple DIY guy, but a retired engineer who’s accustomed to think before he works, and who analyses the techniques used by others.

    And now, seriously:
    You like the off-white tiles?
    I repeat what I said two week ago:
    My (and my wife’s) principle is:
    Keep everything that cannot be changed easily a bit neutral. Variation comes through accessories: towels, curtains, and all the other stuff you expose in a bathroom.


    Christian - bricoleur par passion, pas par necessité http://www.klussen-in-frankrijk.eu/

    #1168997
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    alittlebitfrench
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    Joined: 06 Aug 2013
    Location: France
    Total posts: 2468

    @chris-le-bricoleur wrote:

    @alittlebitfrench wrote:

    That is the top tip of the day, week, and month.

    … of the year, the decade, the century? :D
    I’m just a simple DIY guy, but a retired engineer who’s accustomed to think before he works, and who analyses the techniques used by others.

    And now, seriously:
    You like the off-white tiles?
    I repeat what I said two week ago:
    My (and my wife’s) principle is:
    Keep everything that cannot be changed easily a bit neutral. Variation comes through accessories: towels, curtains, and all the other stuff you expose in a bathroom.

    I totally agree.


    #1168996
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    bentley
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    Joined: 04 May 2008
    Location: Central Brittany
    Total posts: 3730

    Cheers for that explanation Chris.
    I am putting the floor tiles in first and then the wall tiles. I am laying the floor tiles onto a twin bed of 18mm marine play (so total thickness of 36mm) this is on joists at about 25mm centers so should be solid and the two biots oif ply have waterproof coating between the levels, silicon bonded joints, screwed at 80mm centers and an acrylic sealer on the top to hel;p the tile glue bond.
    I dont have any special joints at the bottom join, just a recommended flexible tile grout.
    One part of the wall tiles (in the shower room) is joining to a bespoke made quartz stone shower tray, (1800 x 1100 x 50) and the rest are to the floor tiles.

    You have said to use caulk for the lower joint and not grout?? have I understood this correctly? wont it go mouldy? I was intending to use a top of the range silicon for the bottom most joint.

    Cheers
    Bentley


    Only dead fish go with the flow

    #1168995
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    alittlebitfrench
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    Joined: 06 Aug 2013
    Location: France
    Total posts: 2468

    I would use a flexible grout for the bottom joint and then put a clear/translucide silicone joint over the grout.


    #1168994
    chris-le-bricoleur
    chris-le-bricoleur
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    Joined: 03 Dec 2010
    Location: NL and 52
    Total posts: 1381

    Bentley,
    I’ve said this previouly:@chris-le-bricoleur wrote:

    Grout or caulk?
    At places where walls and/or floor meet I prefer to seal tile joints elastically rather than with grout. This is particularly necessary where walls or floors made from different base materials meet each other. The materials have different expansion coëfficients, they will therefore behave differently under temperature or moisture changes.
    This is generally accepted in the trade.
    Caulk is certainly prone to mould attack, but I find this a minor risk compared with the chance of moisture attack if a grout joint cracks.
    In my bathroom I’ve used:

    1 = white grout, 3mm joints
    2 = grey grout, 5mm joints
    3 = white silicone
    4 = grey silicone
    This photograph was taken to-day; the bathroom is 8 years old. No leaks, no mould.

    ALBF, sounds good, but I have not yet heard of flexible grout. Can you name a brand or give a website?


    Christian - bricoleur par passion, pas par necessité http://www.klussen-in-frankrijk.eu/

    #1168993
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    alittlebitfrench
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    Joined: 06 Aug 2013
    Location: France
    Total posts: 2468

    http://www.weber.fr/pose-du-carrelage/gammes-produits/les-joints-de-carrelage/weberjoint-flex.html

    I think its that ?

    You are right though it will probably crack. I would just fill the void with grout then apply the silcone. The only reason I would do that is that it will make applying the silicone easier and neater. Even if it does crack you will not see it. Its just a double layer of protection.

    Interesting point, if you have built your shower in BC, water will never penetrate it anyway. I doubt very much it will upset the glue either.


    #1168992
    chris-le-bricoleur
    chris-le-bricoleur
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    Joined: 03 Dec 2010
    Location: NL and 52
    Total posts: 1381

    Something just came up in my mind.
    I had seen a joint between wall and floor filled with ‘flexible’ grout. When it ckacked it was covered with a layer of transparent silicone. The cracks were still visible. Not very esthetic.
    And my wife just asked me: Didn’t you put a base layer of grout into the joint before you applied the silicone? And yes I did. Tile cement just from the plasterboard base to the backside ot the tiles, i.e. the thickness of the colle layer, then silicone over the thickness of the tiles.


    Christian - bricoleur par passion, pas par necessité http://www.klussen-in-frankrijk.eu/

    #1168991
    chris-le-bricoleur
    chris-le-bricoleur
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    Joined: 03 Dec 2010
    Location: NL and 52
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    @bentley wrote:

    … I am laying the floor tiles onto a twin bed of 18mm marine play (so total thickness of 36mm) this is on joists at about 25mm centers so should be solid and the two biots of ply have waterproof coating between the levels, silicon bonded joints, screwed at 80mm centers …

    That’s exactly what I did in my former house in the seventies. The walls were in brick. That was the occasion when I discussed the story of different expansion coëfficients of the two types of material with the tiler – and we decided to apply a silicone gap filler between wall and floor tiling.
    The renovation method I used for that floor can be seen here, pic.1+2.
    By the way, at that occasion I had the tile layout scheme done by a colleague using a computerized drawing program, quite new at that time, look for that approach at this menu point.


    Christian - bricoleur par passion, pas par necessité http://www.klussen-in-frankrijk.eu/

    #1168990
    mysty2
    mysty2
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    Joined: 29 Jul 2012
    Location: N/A
    Total posts: 9603

    Your tiling is exceptional but you will get fed up hearing that :D the flushing system that chris has fitted, what happens when or if it goes faulty. In a bog standard bog you have easy access, how do you get in if it stops working? #-o


    #1168989
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    alittlebitfrench
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    Location: France
    Total posts: 2468

    @mysty2 wrote:

    Your tiling is exceptional but you will get fed up hearing that :D the flushing system that chris has fitted, what happens when or if it goes faulty. In a bog standard bog you have easy access, how do you get in if it stops working? #-o

    The button that flushes the loo is also a trap :shock:

    Use your Brain Mysty


    #1168988
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    mikej
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    Joined: 21 Jun 2011
    Location: Dordogne sometimes and Kent the rest
    Total posts: 5287

    According to the blurb on most of these cantilever loos, all maintenance can be carried out through the push button access plate hole.

    Mike


    WFIPFLL

    #1168987
    chris-le-bricoleur
    chris-le-bricoleur
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    Joined: 03 Dec 2010
    Location: NL and 52
    Total posts: 1381

    mysty2,
    I’ve answered this in an earlier post@chris-le-bricoleur wrote:

    Accessability of the cistern components:
    There is really a big difference between the cheapo’s and the better toilets. I have chosen the relatively expensive brand ‘Geberit’ and have tested the accessability of components in their showroom. Remove the operating panel (not just a letterbox) and you have free access to the inlet valve and the flushing mechanism; both can easily be exchanged.

    Thus no problem for me.


    Christian - bricoleur par passion, pas par necessité http://www.klussen-in-frankrijk.eu/

    #1168986
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    bentley
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    Joined: 04 May 2008
    Location: Central Brittany
    Total posts: 3730

    Cheers for that Chris, I do like the belt and braces approach and I have an aversion top potential leaks. It must be the sailor in me :shock: (oh hang on! that sounds a bit iffy :lol: )


    Only dead fish go with the flow

    #1168985
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    icey
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    Joined: 29 Jul 2012
    Location: N/A
    Total posts: 4332

    @alittlebitfrench wrote:

    Use your Brain Mysty

    Got to find it first ……. :P


French Plumbing, Heating & Septic Tanks
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