Corsican Delicacies ©Skampixelle

A taste of France: Corsican delicacies

These local specialities provide a real insight into the place they are produced. Ingredients like chestnuts and citrus fruits crop up time and time again… as do names like fiadone and frappes

Photo: Véronique PAGNIER

A Traditional Christmas in Provence

In Provence, on Christmas Eve the family gathers for the traditional Christmas meal known as le Gros Souper (the big supper). This meal begins with seven meatless dishes, ending with the ritual number of 13 desserts…

tarte tatin

French food classics: Tarte Tatin

This upside-down apple tart originated in the Sologne region under rather unconventional circumstances. Florence Derrick investigates the story behind one of France’s best-loved desserts.

jambon cru french ham

Chestnuts and charcuterie: Corsican food

Slap bang in between Italy and France, this Mediterranean island was the birthplace of the Emperor Napoléon and its cuisine consists of a glorious collision of the two cultures. Florence Derrick digs in…

Violets of Toulouse

Ask any Toulousain about the emblems of the pink city and you can be sure that violets will make the list. Their enchanting fragrance and significant colour even inspired the city’s other nickname: the City of Violets.

Visiting a Calvados distillery in Normandy

In Lower Normandy, apple cider has been distilled into brandy since the Middle Ages. Florence Derrick visits the Boulard family distillery in Coquainvilliers, where 85% of the region’s tipple is produced…

Taste of the terroir: Marne

We propose a toast to Marne, where grapes are grown and both red and white wines flow! From coq au vin de Bouzy, to chocolate liqueurs, this departement’s delicacies are inextricably linked to the fruit of its vines.

Tried and tested: Comté cheese

Who knew that France produces more Comté – or Gruyère de Comté, to give it its proper name – than any other of its AOC cheeses? There’s got to be good reason…

Photo Dordogne Perigord Tourisme

Market day in the Dordogne

Market day is important in rural Dordogne – an opportunity to buy fresh food from local producers and catch up on news from friends and neighbours in the area. If you are used to supermarket fruits and vegetables, be prepared to change your shopping habits forever.

French onion soup fit for a king

Gloriously rich and sweet, with just the right amount of acidity, French onion soup defies the modest reputation of its main ingredient. However, when the dish was invented, it was simply a case of the allium being in the right place at the right time…

Culinary specialities of Franche-Comté

This mostly rural, relatively little-explored region abutting Switzerland is best known for its cheese and charcuterie yet boasts a unique of variety of wine dating back to the Romans. Florence Derrick investigates…

The origins of Cognac

Located on the banks of the Charente, Cognac has a history as rich as its famous drink’s flavour. The area has been inhabited since the Prehistoric era and, even if their origins remain a mystery, there are still relics from

Food specialities of the Midi-Pyrénées

The Midi-Pyrénées is a region created around what is now the capital, Toulouse, the ‘pink city’ famous for its sausages. In France, the rules relating to how they are made are strict and only the best carry a prestigious red label. The authentic Toulouse sausage is free

Food specialities in Centre and Val de Loire

The Loire Valley area makes up one of the largest regions in metropolitan France, birthplace of writer François Rabelais and his most famous character, Gargantua – a giant with an enormous appetite and a taste for the local fouaces… Like pitta pockets spiced with saffron (Safran du

Classic French dish: Boeuf Bourguignon

In the winter we all need dishes such as this to nourish body and soul. Florence Derrick charts the origins and history of this all-time French classic, a slow-cooked stew that’s equally pleasurable at home or sampled at your favourite bistro

Photo by Maarten Danial

Roquefort cheese from the Aveyron

Roquefort is a flavourful ewe’s-milk blue cheese and is France’s second most popular cheese after Comté. During the Age of Enlightenment, the French philosopher Diderot attributed the title “King of Cheeses” to Roquefort cheese, declaring in 1782 that “Roquefort cheese is without doubt the finest cheese in Europe”.

Photo by KimonBerlin via Flickr

Black truffles from the Languedoc

The black truffle, also known as the ‘black pearl’ or ‘black diamond’ of the kitchen, is one of the most expensive edible mushrooms in the world. It is harvested from November to February not just in the Perigord, but also in a number of other regions where conditions are favourable, and that includes the Languedoc and Provence.

Why do we love Dijon Mustard?

I grew up on mustard and always had it in a simple vinaigrette with oil, vinegar, salt and pepper. The beauty was that the dressing could be made as mild or powerful as us children could stand. I remember that, as a kid,

Pâté de campagne

As with all our favourite French classics, the origins of this pork pâté are humble and rustic. Florence Derrick claims that this sublime terrine’s versatility is the secret to its success, proving that when it comes to good food, simplicity is sometimes best

Taste of the terroir: The Île d’Oléron

The Île d’Oléron, off the west coast of the Charente-Maritime region, boasts a lengthy tradition of gastronomy. Daily markets take place all over the island, from the towns of Saint-Denis and Saint-Georges to La Bréeles-Bains and Dolus, showcasing over 90

Dijon Mustard

“There is no mustard except in Dijon”. Purist gourmands will agree that this 14th-century Lillois proverb rings just as true today, although mustard itself dates back to Roman times. Dijon mustard as we now know it didn’t appear until the

The food and drink of Rhône-Alpes

Home to the country’s ‘gastronomic capital’, Lyon, as well as famous Alpine resorts such as Méribel and Chambéry, the Rhône-Alpes region has plenty to offer in the way of hearty, traditional dishes, as well as innovative Michelin quality menus.

The food and drink of Franche-Comté

The region is well-known for its Comté cheese and ‘yellow wine’, but other local specialities like smoked ham and cherry jam help make any trip to Franche-Comté a real voyage of gastronomic discovery.

Foie gras explained

A look at the different French foie gras products. Being unused to this product in the UK, the various forms of foie gras can be confusing at first.

Taste of the terroir: Pays Basque

From seafood restaurants to market stalls, via Michelin stars and gastronomic fairs, food from the Pays Basque – nestled between the Atlantic Ocean and the Spanish Pyrénées in SW France – can be savoured in all seasons.

Taste of the terroir: Nord-Pas de Calais

Situated between the sea and the farmlands of the Avesnois and the Monts des Flandres, Nord-Pas de Calais offers an unexpected cuisine which will delight the palate of the adventurous in quest of lovely culinary surprises.

Specialities from Picardy

Sandwiched between Normandy and Champagne-Ardenne, the Picardy region of France is home to some delicious dairy products and can sell its fizz as authentic champagne.

Specialities from Dordogne

Local fruit and vegetables vary according to season, but confit de canard and foie gras are in constant supply. Obvious accompaniments are truffles and walnuts – both readily available here. The Bergerac wine region ensures there is something good to drink as well.

Veau de l’Aveyron

The Aveyron is the No.1 producer of meat in the south of France and is particularly renowned for the quality of it’s meat, the Label Rouge guarantees the superior quality. In the Aveyron, and especially in Segala, the veal farmers adhere to this label and look after their calves as well as on any other animal farm.

Tarn Food & Drink

Whatever food or drink you like, you will never be hungry or thirsty in the Tarn. Tarn specialities are wide-ranging and full of flavour including specialities such as Truffles, Cepes, Wild Boar, Veal, Garlic, Echaudés Biscuits, Jambon de Lacaune,Pumpkin Pancakes which can all be accompanied by wines from Gaillac.

Breton Gastronomy

“Breton food & drink”Combining aspects of “Armor” the landscape of the sea and “Argoat” the landscape of woodlands, Breton gastronomy has over the years benefited from all the riches offered by the natural …

Photo by Alex Brown via Flickr

Brittany cider: a treat for all seasons

Breton ciders are a clear or cloudy beverage made from apples, with a fine foamy head and bubbles in the body of the liquid. Delicious summer and winter, and the perfect partner to a galette Bretonne.