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Pets in France

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Pets in France • Meet your topic host

Diana James
Hello and welcome to the FrenchEntrée Pets in France zone, providing you with the information including transporting your pets to France, getting your pet microchipped or a pet passport, and getting your pets vaccinated. We also have a section dedicated to information about animal rescue centres and charities in France.

I qualified as a vet at the Royal Veterinary College in 1990 then worked at a mixed practice in Huntingdonshire and then a small animal vets in Folkestone for 10 years. In 2002 I moved to the Lot et Garonne with my family. After three years, I felt ready to start working here and was accepted on to the Ordre of Vétérinaires. I have worked as a vétérinaire à domicile which meant visiting pets at their homes but now I see people at my home, though there are still home visits to do. I also do operations.


Diana James, Pet Topic Host

If you have any pet related questions or would like to make a contribution to the zone please get in touch with the editor.

HOW TO... feed the birds

Robin
Find out how to help your local flock thrive this winter. And with the right food, you may even be able to tempt in a new visitor or two more...

Editor's picks

Ever thought of adopting a dog in France? Plenty of Gallic pooches are in need of a loving home! more...

Pet passport procedure

From 1 January 2012 Dog on holidayPet passports mean that your much-loved animal can easily travel with you to France, but getting your pet ready for travel can take weeks or months. Vet Diana James takes you through the process, step-by-step. more...

'I set up an animal charity in France'

We talk to Sheelagh Johnson, co-founder of Phoenix Association Rik and SheelaghPhoenix Association is a Dordogne-based charity that exists to deal with the sad plight of the ever-increasing number of abused and abandoned animals in France. Phoenix was established by Richard and Sheelagh Johnson. more...

Guide to dog vaccinations in France

Prevention is better than cure Dog vaccinationA vaccine is designed to stimulate your pet’s immune system so they have a ‘memory’ of a certain disease. This means that if they come across this disease, they will have a faster and stronger immune system reaction to battle against the disease. Here is our guide of important dog vaccinations in France and their French names. more...

Guide to cat vaccinations in France

Cat in gardenVaccination is a means of protecting your cat against some of the most serious cat diseases, by giving a primary course of 2 injections (primovaccination) then “topping up" the cover with yearly boosters (rappels)... more...

Getting your pet ready for travel

Advice from Animalcouriers Pet passportAnimalcouriers are licensed animal hauliers with a UK State Veterinary Service Licence to carry animals by road throughout Europe. They also provide shipping solutions to places further afield. As members of the International Pet Animal Transport Association, they have high standards in their management of the animals they transport... more...

Identichipping your pet

puppyIf you're going to bring your pet to France from the UK it will need to be identichipped. Vet Arielle Griffiths explains what the process involves for your pet and how to get the right kind of micro-chip for travel to France more...

Protecting your dog from heatstroke

Dog in carBeating the heat is extra tough for dogs because they can only cool themselves by panting and sweating through their footpads. This process is inefficient when there is only hot air to breathe. Even leaving windows down or providing bowls of water will not stop heat stroke from happening. more...

Pet pests and diseases

dog in long grassIf you're bringing a dog or cat to France you need to know about these portentially fatal pests and diseases that may not be found in your country of origin... more...

Tick Fever in dogs

Dog in grassThe purpose of this article is to outline how this disease carried by ticks can affect dogs and what we can do to reduce the possibility of infection. The main tick borne disease of south west France is known by several names – Babesiosis, Piroplasmosis, Tick Fever.
more...

Chats du Quercy

Cat Rescue and Rehoming Centre Tash the catBased in Miramont de Quercy, (Tarn et Garonne, Midi-Pyrénées) Chats du Quercy is a charity on a mission to find permanent homes for homeless cats and kittens with responsible and caring owners. more...

Adopting a dog or cat in France

CollieAdopting a dog or cat in France is very similar to adopting in the UK. The SPA, (Société Protectrice Animaux) created in 1845 functions as an organisation to promote the well being of animals. They have 57 refuges in France and take in 45,000 animals a year... more...

How to cope with a travel sick dog

dog in car smallYou love bringing your dog to France but as soon at he or she sees the car they start to fret and the journey becomes fraught with problems. What can you do? Vet Arielle Griffiths gives some advice... more...

Animal Aid St Aubin

Animal Aid St AubinAdopt a pet in Poitou-Charentes... "Our main aim - save homeless pets from an undeserved fate, while helping families seeking the pleasure of having a loving companion to share their new French home." Find out more about Animal Aid St Aubin


PoorPaws

Poor PawsSituated in the Lot region of France, we try to home abandoned and unwanted dogs. If you are looking to adopt a dog or a cat, give a PoorPaws a chance... Poorpaws

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